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 Using pseudocode and a flowchart, develop the logic for a program that accepts two numbers as input and displays the product of the numbers. You may use a free online tool or other available tool to draw the flowchart.

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design
Fourth Edition

Chapter 1

An Overview of Computer Programming

Objectives

In this chapter, you will learn about:

  • Computer components and operations
  • Simple program logic
  • The evolution of programming models
  • The steps in the programming process
  • Pseudocode and flowcharts
  • Program comments
  • Programming and user environments

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

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Understanding Computer Components and Operations

  • Computer system
  • Combination of all components required to process and store data using a computer
  • Two major computer system components
  • Hardware
  • Physical devices associated with the computer
  • Software
  • Computer instructions that tell the hardware what to do
  • Programs (sets of instructions) written by programmers
  • Application software: programs applied to a task
  • System software: programs that manage computer resources

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding Computer Components and Operations (cont’d)

  • Three major hardware and software operations
  • Input
  • Processing
  • Output
  • Input operation
  • A means for data to enter a computer through an input device such as a mouse or keyboard

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding Computer Components and Operations (cont’d)

  • Processing data operation
  • Organizing or sorting data
  • Checking for accuracy
  • Performing mathematical operations
  • Tasks occur in central processing unit (CPU)
  • Output operation
  • Means to view, print, or store data using output devices
  • Printer or monitor
  • Storage devices (e.g., disks, flash media)
  • Information: data that has been processed

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding Computer Components and Operations (cont’d)

  • Programming language
  • Instructions controlling data manipulation
  • Examples include Visual Basic, C#, C++, or Java
  • Syntax
  • Rules governing word usage and punctuation for a programming language
  • Syntax errors: mistakes in a language’s usage
  • Program code
  • Instructions written in a programming language

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding Computer Components and Operations (cont’d)

  • Computer memory (RAM)
  • Temporary, internal storage
  • Executable statements
  • Statements that carry out a program’s actions
  • Compiler or interpreter
  • Translate high level programming language statements into low-level machine or binary language
  • Point out syntax errors

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding Computer Components and Operations (cont’d)

  • Compiler
  • Translates entire program before execution
  • Interpreter
  • Translates an instruction just prior to execution
  • Source code
  • Program statements written in a programming language
  • Object code
  • Code translated into machine language statements

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding Simple Program Logic

  • Logic errors
  • Program may execute but produces incorrect results
  • Can be avoided by
  • Writing program instructions in specific sequence
  • Removing extraneous instructions
  • Including all required instructions
  • Example of logic errors in cake-making instructions

Stir

Add two eggs

Add a gallon of gasoline

Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes

Add three cups of flour

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Danger:
Do not follow these cake-baking instructions!

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding Simple Program Logic (cont’d)

  • Computer programs include steps that perform input, processing, and output
  • Sample instructions written in English-like language
  • Program doubles any given number
  • Requires three operations: input, processing, and output

input myNumber  input

myAnswer = myNumber * 2  processing

output myAnswer  output

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding the Evolution
of Programming Models

  • Modern computer programs
  • Around since 1940s
  • Oldest programming languages
  • Programmers worked with memory addresses
  • Memorized awkward codes associated with machine languages
  • Written as one piece

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding the Evolution
of Programming Models (cont’d)

  • Newer programming languages
  • Look like natural language
  • Use meaningful names for memory locations
  • Allow creation of self-contained modules or program segments
  • Can be pieced together
  • Can be reused

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding the Evolution
of Programming Models (cont’d)

  • Major program development techniques
  • Procedural programming
  • Focuses on actions that are carried out
  • Breaks down processes into manageable subtasks
  • Object-oriented programming – focuses on objects
  • Objects: entities that have attributes, behaviors, and states
  • Attributes: object features
  • Behaviors: what object does
  • States: set of all values of attributes
  • Primary difference is focused on early planning stages

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding the Evolution
of Programming Models (cont’d)

  • Object-oriented approach
  • Defining the objects needed to accomplish a task
  • Each object maintains its own data and carries out tasks
  • “Natural” way of thinking about the world
  • Types of object-oriented approach applications
  • Computer simulations
  • Mimic real-world activities
  • Users apply programs to tasks after the programs are written
  • Graphical user interfaces (GUIs)
  • Users interact with program in graphical environment

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding the Steps
in the Programming Process

  • System program
  • A group of many programs
  • Object-oriented approach involves
  • Analyzing the system
  • Designing the system
  • Writing the programs
  • Programmer may do all tasks or use systems analysts and/or software testers

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding the Steps
in the Programming Process (cont’d)

  • Types of software testing
  • Black box
  • Tester provides input and checks for valid output
  • White box
  • Tester looks at code, tests all logical paths

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Analyzing the Program or System

  • Programmers provide a service to users
  • Object-oriented analysis (OOA)
  • Understand the users’ needs
  • Needs are often not well defined
  • Can be difficult and time consuming
  • Frequently, several program revisions are necessary to satisfy the user

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Designing the System

  • Designers using object-oriented design (OOD)
  • Envision the objects needed
  • Determine objects’ attributes and behaviors
  • Decide the relationship between objects
  • Describe how objects communicate with and react to each other
  • Expressed as verb phrases
  • Examples of relationships: “Has a,” “is a,” “creates a”
  • Class
  • A general category that describes entities
  • May be reused from other programs or modified

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Writing and Testing Programs

  • Writing a program involves several subtasks
  • Developing the program logic
  • Coding the program
  • Translating the program into machine language
  • Testing the program

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Writing and Testing Programs (cont’d)

  • Planning the logic
  • Heart of the programming process
  • Also referred to as developing an algorithm
  • Decide steps to include and their order
  • Planning tools
  • Flowcharts and pseudocode
  • Both use English-like code
  • Language syntax not a concern
  • Desk-checking
  • Reviewing program logic on paper

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Writing and Testing Programs (cont’d)

  • Coding the program
  • Writing program statements in a programming language
  • Object-oriented languages
  • C++, C#, Java, Visual Basic, SmallTalk, OO COBOL, and Simula
  • Create objects and establish communication between them
  • Language chosen determines syntax
  • Coding usually less difficult than planning step

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Writing and Testing Programs (cont’d)

  • Use software to translate program into machine language
  • Many programming languages
  • Computer knows only machine language (1s and 0s)
  • Compilers or interpreters
  • Translate English-like, high-level programming language into low-level machine language

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Writing and Testing Programs (cont’d)

  • Syntax error
  • Occurs when translator cannot translate the code
  • Causes: misspellings, illegal grammar, non-existent words
  • Programmer must correct code and recompile the program before it can execute

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Creating an executable program

Figure 1-1

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Writing and Testing Programs (cont’d)

  • Testing the program
  • Program that is free of syntax errors is not necessarily free of logical errors
  • Must test for logical errors
  • May require entering of sample data
  • Select test data carefully
  • Error discovery may require changes to program logic

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Writing and Testing Programs (cont’d)

  • After the program is written and tested
  • Ready to be used
  • Additional tasks associated with programs written for organizations
  • Preparing manuals
  • Training users
  • Converting existing data to new system’s format
  • Conversion
  • Actions an organization take to switch to a new program
  • Can take months or years to accomplish

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Writing and Testing Programs (cont’d)

  • Maintenance
  • Process of making required changes after program is put into production
  • Reasons why maintenance may be necessary
  • Fixing previously undiscovered errors
  • Updating values such as a tax rate
  • Changing format of input data
  • Input data may no longer be available
  • User wants additional functionality

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Using Pseudocode and Flowcharts

  • Pseudocode
  • English-like representation of logical program steps
  • Looks like programming language but is not
  • Flexible planning tool
  • Example

  • Starting and ending statements often used
  • Punctuation and syntax are not important

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

start

input myNumber

myAnswer = myNumber * 2

output myAnswer

stop

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Drawing Flowcharts

  • Flowchart
  • Pictorial representation of logical program steps
  • Helps programmer visualize how statements connect
  • Uses geometric shapes connected with arrows (flowlines)
  • Common flowchart symbols
  • Input symbols (parallelograms)
  • Processing symbols (rectangles)
  • Output symbols (parallelograms)
  • Terminal symbols (lozenges – flattened ovals)
  • Decision symbols (diamonds)

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Drawing Flowcharts (cont’d)

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Flowchart and pseudocode of a program that doubles a number if it is less than 10

Figure 1-3

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

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Drawing Flowcharts (cont’d)

  • Software applications with flowcharting tools
  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Visio
  • Visual Logic

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding Program Comments

  • Program comments
  • Non-executing statements in a program added for documentation
  • Programmers write comments for themselves and others who read program
  • Minimally, comments should include author, date, and purpose of the program
  • C++, Java, and C# use two forward slashes

// This is a comment

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Annotation symbol used for comments on a flowchart

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Three-sided box with dashed line connects to the step it explains

Figure 1-4

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding Programming
and User Environments

  • Flowcharts created by hand or with software
  • Pseudocode written by hand or with a word processor
  • Plain text editor
  • Text editor in an integrated development environment (IDE)
  • Text editor
  • Program used to create simple text files
  • Similar to a word processor, but less robust
  • Example: Notepad in Microsoft Windows
  • Complete program does not require much disk space

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Understanding Programming and User Environments (cont’d)

  • Integrated development environment (IDE)
  • Software package that includes an editor, compiler, and other programming tools
  • Advantages of using IDE
  • Uses colors to display various language components
  • Highlights syntax errors visually
  • Employs automatic statement completion
  • Provides tools to step through a program to find errors
  • Disadvantages of using IDE
  • Requires much more storage space than plain text editor

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

  • A user might execute program in different environments: command line, GUI
  • The logical process is the same regardless of the environment

Understanding User Environments

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Executing a number-doubling program in a command-line environment

Executing a number-doubling program in a GUI environment

Figure 1-7

Figure 1-8

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Summary

  • Hardware and software accomplish three major operations: input, processing, and output
  • For a program to work properly, you must develop correct logic
  • Logical errors are more difficult to locate than syntax errors
  • Developing a system involves analyzing the system, designing it, and writing the programs
  • Writing programs involves logic planning, coding the program, translating into machine language, and testing

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Summary (cont’d)

  • Flowcharts and pseudocode are tools for planning a program’s logic
  • Pseudocode is an English-like representation of a program’s logical steps
  • Flowchart is a pictorial representation of a program
  • Program comments document a program
  • Plain text editor or an integrated development environment (IDE) can be used to type a program
  • A program’s data input can be at a command line or a graphical user interface (GUI)

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An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

An Object-Oriented Approach to Programming Logic and Design

Visual Logic Instructions and Assignments

Visual Logic can be installed from the CD that accompanies our textbook. It is a nifty tool
for creating program flowcharts, but that is only half of the story. Until this software
came along, flowcharts were static diagrams that outlined the flow of execution of a
computer program. When a Visual Logic flowchart is done, you can run the program
“behind” the flowchart. This is a great learning resource for budding programmers.

You can even create interactive programs that allow the user to input values for variables
at runtime. Visual Logic is a terrific tool for grasping basic programming concepts such as
variables, operators, expressions, branching, and looping. It is excellent preparation for
more sophisticated programming with Visual Basic.NET. We hope you like it!

Install Visual Logic on your home PC by accepting all defaults in the installation wizard.
Then, put the CD away in a safe place.

Once installed, Visual Logic can be started in the usual
way from the Windows Start menu. On the “splash
screen” shown here, click on “Continue” to produce the
starting flowchart. The starting
flowchart displays a “Begin” and “End”
symbol as shown. To create a flowchart,
you add symbols between these starting

symbols.

Lesson One : Sample Visual Logic Program
( perform the actions that are in boldface )

Hover your mouse over the red arrow between the Begin and
End symbols. It will turn green, indicating that you can click on it
to get a popup window. This popup window has the other symbols
we will need to create programs.

Click on the green arrow and select the Output symbol.

This inserts the Output symbol into the
flowchart as shown. The Output symbol produces
output on the display screen. Next, we will
specify what the program should output.

Double click on the Output symbol to get the

Output dialog box.

Output that consists of a
text message must be

enclosed in quotes. This
is called a string.

The button in the lower left corner of the Output dialog toggles between More >> and
<<Less. Clicking on More >> reveals that there are 3 Output types. For now, leave the type
as “Dialog Box” as shown.

Enter your own name and be sure to enclose it within quotes. Later, we will use
variables that don’t use quotes. Click on the “OK” button when done, and the Output symbol
will change to show your intended output.

Run the program by clicking on the button on the toolbar, or by pressing the F5
function key.

Your name should appear in a popup dialog box as shown above on
the right. If you got red error windows like the one on the left,
you likely forgot one, or both, quotes. We all do this now and then
but, no problem, it’s easy to debug. Just close the error windows,
double click on the Output symbol, and add
the quotes around your name. Run it again
and it should work fine.

Click on the green arrow below the first Output symbol to add
another Output symbol. Make this second Output generate the
output “Visual Logic is fun”.

Run the program again. Did you remember the quotes? You should
get two popup dialogs, one after the other.

Edit the first Output by clicking the More >> button. Select “console”. An odd looking
“line feed” symbol, §, will be appended to your name. This is normal for console output.

Summary
• Text output must be enclosed within quotes
• The More>> and <<Less toggle buttons will reveal or hide symbol options
• Console output will be to one window and is indicated by a small rectangle
• The § symbol causes a line feed in a console window

Click on OK.
Edit the second Output box in
the same manner to select
console output.

Note: the small white rectangle
that now appears in each Output
symbol indicates console output.

Run the program again.

It may seem that nothing happened, but if you look on the taskbar at the bottom of your
screen, you will see that a new window has been created.

Click to open this console window. You should see a window as
below ( although much larger ). This is console output, output to one window.

But the output needs more work. We need
a space, or better yet, a line feed after
the name.

Double click the first Output symbol. Position
the cursor just to the left of the § symbol and
press Enter. The § symbol will be moved down to
the second line as shown below. This will cause a
line feed in the output.

Run the program once more. You should now get
two lines of output in your console window.

Save this program as example1 on your PC.
Visual Logic will add a .vls filename extension to
save the file as example1.vls on your system.

Visual Logic Assignment One
Create a Visual Logic program named VLogic1.vls that uses four Outputs. The first three
Outputs should create a console window similar to the one shown here. Specify your name,
place of birth, and hobby or pastime. The fourth Output should create the popup dialog
box exactly as shown.

This is the console
window.

This is the popup dialog window.

Save the program as VLogic1.vls

Lesson Two ( perform actions in boldface )

Start a new Visual Logic program with File | New on the menu.
Insert an Input symbol. The Input symbol is a parallelogram like the Output
symbol, but unlike Output, it “leans” to the right.

Double click on the Input symbol and click More>> to expand the window.

Inputs are special because they enable a user to
enter data when the program runs. Inputs require you
to specify a variable name and a prompt.

The prompt will inform the user of the expected
input, and the variable will accept and hold what the
user enters. Complete the Input as shown.

Insert another Input below the first Input.
Configure this Input to ask a user for his/her age
as shown. Pay attention to the case of your variable
names. These names follow the variable naming
convention used in Visual Basic.

NOTE: If you forget to specify a prompt in an Input, Visual Logic will supply a generic
prompt that is not very user friendly. Avoid this by expanding the Input with More >> and
specifying a helpful prompt.

Insert an Assignment symbol (a rectangle ) below the second Input.
Assignment symbols interpret an
expression on the right side of
an = sign and assign the result to
a variable named on the left side
of the = sign.

You can start receiving Social Security payments at age 62. The Assignment shown above
computes the number of years before a user could start receiving payments and stores it
in a variable named SocialStart.

Insert an Output below the Assignment.
Configure the Output as shown here.

Explanation of this Output
This Output introduces the & (ampersand) symbol in Outputs. The & is used to link strings
of characters enclosed in quotes with variables that do not use quotes. Computer
programmers called this linking concatenation. In this case, we have the variable YourName
concatenated with the short string “ is “, the variable Age, and the string “ years of age”.
The spaces inside the strings are necessary to avoid jamming the variables up against
characters in the strings.

Insert another Output above the End symbol. Configure it as shown below.

This Output concatenates the SocialStart variable between the two strings. Again, note
the spaces after “in” and before “years” are essential for good quality output.

Run the program by clicking on the button on the toolbar, or by pressing the F5
function key.

Here is a sample run of the program:

NOTE: When prompted to input your name, enclose it in quotes. Always use quotes around
text Inputs. Do not enclose the number entered for your age. Never use quotes with
numeric input.

If you got a red error screen, check your work for quotes. It’s easy to forget one.

Edit all Inputs and Outputs by clicking on More >> and selecting the console option.
The small white rectangle will indicate the console. In the first Output, press Enter with
the cursor in front of the line feed symbol §. The program should appear as below on the
left.

Run the program again to see the console output. It
should appear as below:

Save the program as example2.vls on your system.

Whether you choose console output or dialog output is
often a matter of personal preference.

Console output is better when you need to review your
previous Inputs later in a program.

Summary
• An Input symbol is used to enter data into a program during a program run
• Inputs store the entered data in variables, and are best with helpful prompts
• Text input must be within quotes but numeric input is never inside quotes
• An Assignment symbol interprets an expression and stores the result in a variable
• The Assignment symbol in a flowchart is a rectangle
• Always use meaningful variable names. For example, use Age for age…not x
• The & character is used to concatenate variables and strings in Outputs
• Spaces at the beginning or end of strings avoids “jams” when concatenating

Visual Logic Assignment Two
Create a Visual Logic program that prompts the user to enter two numbers and then
displays the sum, product, and average of the numbers. The entire program should run in
one console window. Here are two sample runs:

Save the program as VLogic2.vls.
Hints

• Use the * operator for multiplication as shown
• You will need sharp concatenation skills to get the outputs. Always place an &

between a variable and a quoted string
• You will need 2 Inputs, 3 Assignments, and at least 1 Output. It can be done with

one Output (by pressing Enter for line feeds) but if you use 3 Outputs that’s OK.

Lesson Three ( perform actions in boldface )

This assignment simulates a checkout in a retail store and covers these Visual Logic skills:
• Inputting non-numeric values for variables
• The built-in CurrencyFormat function
• A complete list of arithmetic operators

Start a new Visual Logic program. Insert an Input
symbol, and use it to prompt the user to enter
his/her name as shown. Remember to enclose the
prompt in quotes, and select console. Add a few
spaces before the closing quote, too.

Add two more Input symbols, one for the unit price of a
merchandise item, and the other for the quantity
purchased. Use console, appropriate variable names, and
suitable prompts for both Inputs.

Now use an Assignment symbol to calculate the extended
price (unit price x quantity) and store it in another
variable.

At this point, the sample program should look something
much like the graphic on the right.

Finally, use an Output symbol (in console) to summarize all
of the Inputs.

The final output might be as
shown here.
The entire program consists
of just five symbols, namely
three Inputs, one
Assignment, and one Output
(in that order).

NOTE: When entering the
name, use quotes. Always
use quotes for non-numeric
inputs.
NOTE: This Output
generated the final three
lines of output.
FormatCurrency

Visual Logic has a number of built-in functions. The FormatCurrency function can produce
better output for the UnitPrice and ExtPrice in our sample program. To use
FormatCurrency, identify the variable to be formatted inside the parentheses ( ) as shown
next.

Adding FormatCurrency function (in two locations)

New output with currency format where suitable
Save this example as retail.vls

Arithmetic Operators
The following table summarizes the Visual Logic arithmetic operators, and their usage in
arithmetic expressions. You will use most of these in future assignments.

Operator Operation Example Explanation

+ addition Sum = 5 + 3 Sum = 8
– subtraction Diff = 5 – 3 Diff = 2
* multiplication Product = 5 * 3 Product = 15
/ real division Quotient = 5 / 3 Quotient = 1.6666666
integer division Answer = 5 3 Answer = 1 ( no decimals )
^ exponentiation Power = 5 ^ 3 Power = 125 ( 5*5*5 )

Mod modulus Remainder = 5 Mod 3 Remainder = 2

NOTE: modulus is another term for the remainder after division. Some more examples:
22 Mod 5 evaluates to 2 ( 5 divides into 22 four times with 2 remainder )
36 Mod 7 evaluates to 1 ( 7 divides into 36 five times with 1 remainder )

Summary
• Always enclose non-numeric input within quotes
• Press enter in an Output symbol to get a line feed (for a new line)
• Visual Logic has seven arithmetic operators
• The FormatCurrency function can be used to display dollars and cents

Visual Logic Assignment Three
Create a Visual Logic program that calculates a user’s weekly paycheck. The program
should prompt the user for his/her name, rate of pay, and hours worked. Then, the
program should summarize the input. Strive to duplicate this output (all in the console).
Note the currency formats in the output. Save as payroll.vls.

Lesson Four ( perform actions in boldface )
Virtually all computer programs of any significance can make decisions and execute
different branches of code based on the decision outcome. Often this means that one
block of code will execute if a specified condition is true, but another block of code will
execute if that condition was false.

In most programming languages, branching is
achieved with IF. Visual Logic is no exception.
To illustrate branching, we will create a Visual
Logic program that determines if a user is old
enough to vote in the USA.

Start a new Visual Logic program and set up
an Input symbol as shown here. The Dialog
Box option is selected.

Insert an IF condition symbol immediately after the Input. Note that the IF symbol is
a diamond. Note too that the IF creates two branches, True and False. The False branch is
also known as the ELSE branch.

Double click on the IF diamond to get the dialog box. This allows us to enter the
condition for the IF symbol. In our case, the condition must test the user’s age.

Enter Age >= 18 as the condition. Then click OK. The symbol
>= means “greater than or equal to”, and as you know the voting
age is 18 in the USA.

NOTE: All IF conditions are expressions that evaluate to either
True or False.
NOTE: All IF conditions use one or more conditional operators. See a list on the next page.
Next, we add symbols to each branch of the IF.

Insert an Output in the True branch. Configure it to output “You are of voting age”.
Insert an Output in the False branch that will output “You are too young to vote”.

Your completed program should look like this:

Run the program a few times. Try ages older and younger than 18. Try 18, too.
Save the program as agevote.vls.

The program should respond properly with respect to the Age variable. This simple
program used only one symbol in both branches of the IF, but multiple operations in each
branch are common.

Operators Used for IF conditions
Conditional Operator Explanation

< Less than
> Greater than
<= Less than or equal to
>= Greater than or equal to
= Equal to
<> Not equal to

Nested IFs
The branches of an IF diamond can themselves contain
IFs that have their own branches. This is called nesting.
For example, a program that qualifies a voter in the
USA should ensure that the user is a US citizen, in
addition to the age test. Let’s try this.

Delete the Output in the True branch of voteage.vls

and in its place add the Input symbol for Citizen shown
here.
Insert an IF symbol under the Citizen Input in the True
branch. Specify the condition as shown here.

Add Outputs to the branches of this second IF as shown

Save it again. Run the program with different ages and try both possible responses to
the Citizen Input. Make sure that you use quotes around your response to the Citizen
Input. The output should be what would be expected. If not, contact
your instructor. The entire program should now appear as shown next.
If your program gets too expansive for the display, reduce the % on the toolbar.

Compound Conditions
By using logical operators, programmers can create compound conditions for IF symbols.

Logical Operators
Operator Explanation

AND Less than
OR Greater than
NOT Less than or equal to

As an example of a compound condition, we will modify the previous program to make it
detect a teenager.

Load the voteage.vls program if necessary. Save it as teenager.vls (to make a copy).
Delete everything under the Age Input.
Add an IF diamond and edit the condition as
shown here. Click OK.

This compound condition will be True for a
teenager, since teenagers are aged between 13 and 19, inclusive. Note that there are two
distinct conditions separated by the logical operator AND, and note that both conditions
must be True for a teenager.

NOTE: Each condition in a compound condition must be enclosed within parentheses.

Edit the Output symbols as shown below:

Run the program at least three times. Try ages for teenagers and ages that are too
young or too old for a teenager.
Note that the False branch executes for input that is too young or too old.
Save the program again as teenager.vls.

Visual Logic Assignment Four

This program enhances payroll.vls from Assignment Three. You can save effort by loading
it and saving another console version as overtime.vls. In the new version:

• Delete the Input for the user’s name ( to simplify things )
• Add Input that asks if the employer pays overtime at “time and a half” for hours

over 40 in one week ( 42 hours = 2 hours of OT, which earns 3 hours of pay )
• Add an IF branch to determine if OT pay applies based on this Input
• Add an IF branch to determine the OT pay (if any is deserved )
• Add Output(s) showing the total pay ( regular pay and OT, if any and applicable )

Here are some possible runs for the program:

In the above run, note that OT is not an issue since the weekly hours are not over 40.

In the above run, since hours exceed 40, the prompt about the employer’s OT policy
appears but the employer does not pay “Time and a half”, so no OT is paid

Summary
• IF symbols can execute operations when the specified condition evaluates as True
• Operations can be executed when specified condition evaluates as False
• Conditional operators are used to create the expressions for IF conditions
• Logical operators can be used to write expressions for compound conditions
• IF symbols may be nested inside other IF symbols. This is termed nesting.

In this final run, hours exceed 40 and the employer pays “time and a half”. The 4 hours of
OT earn 4 x 1.5 x 10 = $60.00 of OT pay.

NOTE: Your program should run in a like manner for these inputs.
Save as overtime.vls.

Lesson Five ( perform actions in boldface )
This lesson is about loops. Often, computer programs need to repeat a block of code. The
most efficient way to do this is by placing the code inside a loop. Like most programming
languages, Visual Logic provides several methods for creating loops, namely For Loops and
While Loops. In this lesson you will learn about For Loops.

Start a new Visual Logic program.
For loops use a “loop control variable” to either continue or halt the loop. As well as a name
for the loop control variable (in the example below this is Count), there are three settings
the programmer must specify in a for loop dialog box (as shown):

1. an Initial Value
• this is the starting value for the Count

variable
2. a Final Value

• this is the stop value for the Count variable
3. a Step

• this is the amount by which the Count
variable will change in each loop cycle

Insert a For Loop symbol and configure it as shown here. Click OK when done.

The dialog box shown here is setting up a loop that will cycle 10 times. Count will start at 1
and increase by 1 in each loop cycle, stopping when Count reaches a value of 10. This means
that Count will have the values 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10. We can prove this.

Inside the loop, insert an Output symbol and configure it as shown. Run the program.

NOTE: Any / all of the three settings
could be variables that hold numbers.

NOTE: The “line feed” symbol, §, causes the Count values to be displayed one per line

Edit the For Loop symbol. Enter new values as shown
here. Run the program again. Save as forloop1.vls.

You should get output from 10 – 100 in increments of 10.
A negative value for Step can be useful when the Initial
Value is greater than the Final Value.

Here’s another example that outputs a “times table” like the ones that can be found on the
back cover of a grade school notebook.

Start a new Visual Logic program. Insert an Input and configure it as shown.

Insert a For Loop symbol and configure it to cycle from 1 to 12 as shown above.
Inside the loop, insert an Output using concatenation to display the “times table”.

Run the program. Try some different inputs for Table.
Your output should be something like the output shown above.
Save as timestab.vls.

CHALLENGE: Can you generate output that counts
backwards from 10 to zero in decrements of 2?

For Loops are best suited for programs in which the number of loop
cycles, or iterations, are predictable or known at the outset.

Visual Logic Assignment Five
Create a Visual Logic program named namesay.vls. The program should prompt the user to
enter his/her name and the number of times it should be displayed. Then, it should use the
variable storing the number of times the name is displayed to generate output as shown in
the two sample runs below. A For Loop is required.

Lesson Six ( perform actions in boldface )
This lesson is about While Loops. Like For Loops, While Loops also can also execute
instructions repeatedly. A While Loop will cycle if a specified condition is True. The
condition is typically an expression using conditional operators such as < or >.

Start a new Visual Logic
program.
Insert an Assignment
symbol and configure it
as shown.

Summary
• Loops use a “loop control variable” to run one or more enclosed instructions repeatedly.
• Each run through the loop is called a cycle or iteration.
• The number of cycles depends on the Initial Value, Step, and Final Value of the loop

control variable
• Any or all of the three For Loop settings for the loop control variable can be numeric

variables

The Assignment declares a value named Num and initializes it to a value of zero. Num will
be the loop control variable.

Insert a While Loop symbol and configure it as
shown here.
The While Loop is being configured to execute
repeatedly when Num is less than 10. The “Pre-Test”
option specifies that the condition should be checked
before the loop starts, and at the start of each
iteration.

Insert an Output symbol within the While
Loop and configure it as shown. Be sure to
select Console.
This symbol as configured should output the
value of Num and generate a line feed. At this
point, your program should look like the
graphic below on the right.

It isn’t correct yet, but run the program.

You will get a console window that looks like
the one on the left.
Something is wrong. The program is locked in
an endless loop. It is still running and it will
continue to run until you stop it by clicking on

the “Terminate” button on the toolbar.
We have made a programming logic error to
make a point. A While Loop must contain a “modifying statement” that will
modify the loop control variable, or an endless loop results.

Stop the program by clicking on the “Terminate” button on the toolbar.
Insert this Assignment symbol and
configure it as shown.
This Assignment will modify Num by

incrementing it, so
that the loop will
end gracefully.

Run the program again.
You should get the values from 0 to 9 in a console window as shown here.

When Num got to 10, the While Loop condition became False, and the program ended.
Save this example as while1.vls.
Now let’s see what that “Pre-Test” option was all about.
Edit the first Assignment. Give Num an initial value of 11. Run the program again.
Nothing happens because, with Num being 11, the condition of the While Loop evaluates to
false before the loop starts (11 is not less than 10). The program follows the False route,
and ends without ever running the While Loop at all.

Edit the While Loop symbol. Select “Post-Test” instead of “Pre-Test”.
The Visual Logic program reacts on your screen to reflect this change. The
program now looks like the graphic here. The “Post-Test” selection means
that the condition will be tested at the end of the loop. By force, the
While Loop will run at least once when “Post-Test” is selected. In this case
it does run only once, because the condition evaluates to False (11 is not
less than 10). The program should output 11 and nothing else.

Exit Loop and Intentional Endless Loops
Visual Logic has an Exit Loop symbol that will immediately end a loop, and allow the
program to continue with any instructions that might follow the loop. Usually the Exit Loop
symbol is used inside an IF, to stop a loop when a specified IF condition is True.

Exit Loop is also useful inside intentional endless loops. An endless loop isn’t always a
programming error. A Visual Logic program might use an intentional endless loop to
repeatedly run one or more instructions until a certain IF condition is met. When the IF
condition is True, Exit Loop is used to end the endless loop. This is especially useful for
validating user input to a program. An endless loop can run over and over again until the
user enters the input as desired. While Loops can be made intentionally endless by
entering True as the while condition. Here is an intentional endless While Loop that
validates the entry of a test score. The loop won’t allow a TestScore higher than 100.

What’s better? For Loops or While Loops?
In many cases, a programming task can be handled by either choice but,
as mentioned earlier, For Loops are better suited for situations in which
the exact number of iterations is known in advance.

Visual Logic Assignment Six
Write a program called VLogic6.vls that asks the user to enter an odd integer and runs
repeatedly until he/she complies. Thank the user when the input is odd and let the user
know if the input is incorrect. Use an endless While Loop and the Exit Loop symbol. The
entire program should run in a console window.
HINT: You will need the modulus operator (Mod) to test for an odd number in the IF. This
task may stump you at first, but if you really think about how you identify odd numbers,
you will succeed. Here is a sample run:

Lesson Seven ( perform actions in boldface )
This lesson is about accumulators. Many computer programs that feature loops make use
of accumulators. An accumulator is a variable that increases by the value of another
variable. An accumulator is like a bucket into which a program can toss numbers. Both
counters and accumulators should be initialized with a value of zero. When you approach
the checkout at the supermarket, your initial total bill is an accumulator with a value of
zero. As each item you are purchasing is rung up, the bill “accumulates” by the price of
each item. As another example, we will create a program
that calculates the average of three inputted numbers.

Start a new Visual Logic program and begin it with an
Assignment symbol for an accumulator named Total.
Initialize Total to zero.

Add a For Loop that will iterate 3 times so the user
can input 3 numbers. Inside the For Loop, insert an
Input symbol for a variable named Number. Use the
Console option and a suitable prompt.
At this point your program should appear as shown here.

Summary
• While Loops will continue to execute when the condition evaluates as True.
• Without an Assignment that modifies the variable in the condition, an endless loop results.
• A “Pre-Test” While Loop might never run at all (if the condition is False on starting).
• A “Post-Test” While Loop runs at least once since the condition is at the end of the loop.
• An endless While Loop using the Exit Loop symbol can be a useful programming technique.

Beneath the Input, add an
Assignment symbol to
accumulate Total by the
value of Number as shown.

After the loop (just above End), insert an Assignment to calculate the Average of the
numbers that were entered.

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