Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Please respond if you can complete in 2.5 hours write 600 words with min 2-3 peer reviewed reference | Max paper
  

Please respond if you can complete in 2.5 hours

write 600 words with min 2-3 peer reviewed references

“Zooming In” Activity 7: Space X page 483 – Part 1

Answer critical thinking.

Critical Thinking

• Why are proposals vitally important to a company such as SpaceX?

• How are proposals at SpaceX similar to and different from proposals or long reports written by students?

• How can team members maintain consistency and meet deadlines when writing important, time constrained, multivolume documents such as formal proposals?

Guffey, Mary Ellen; Loewy, Dana. Business Communication: Process & Product (p. 483). Cengage Learning. Kindle Edition.

Your submission must be double-spaced with uniform 1-inch margins and using 12-point Times New Roman font.

Please refer below article and reference inorder to answer this questions

Material:

Business Communication: Process & Product (9th Edition) by Guffey and Loewy (ISBN-13: 9781305957961) Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (7th Edition) (ISBN-13: 9781433832161)

SpaceX Soars on the Wings of its Proposals Founded in 2002, Space Exploration Technologies Corporation, known simply as SpaceX, has quickly become a nimble player in the challenging and capital-intensive aerospace industry. With only 4,000 employees, the Hawthorne, California–based company has in some respects surged ahead of much larger competitors such as Boeing, winning government contracts with NASA worth billions.1 Led by its charismatic founder, Elon Musk, SpaceX has secured the most missions to resupply the International Space Station (ISS) at least through 2024. Several U.S. commercial contractors are vying for a NASA budget for ISS missions of $14 billion over the next decade. Elon Musk, who also cofounded PayPal and Solar City and simultaneously runs Tesla Motors, is a relentless, hard-driving boss. An extraordinary mind, Musk is infamous for putting in 100+ work hours a week and sleeping in his office when his company must solve problems or meet deadlines. He exhibits a fierce, crushing temper and expects unflagging commitment from his many brilliant engineers. He famously said to his employees who routinely work 80-hour weeks: “Not enough of you are working on Saturdays.”2 Considered by many a real-life Iron Man, Musk is an inventor and business magnate known for his bold vision of the future, most prominently of space travel to Mars to establish a presence on the Red Planet. One of the greatest triumphs for SpaceX came when the company secured a groundbreaking deal to develop a spacecraft to ferry astronauts to the ISS again, thus ending the sole reliance of the United States on Russian launches. Boeing was awarded $4.2 billion and SpaceX received $2.6 billion, each to develop what NASA calls a “differently redundant” space taxi to lower technical risk and keep a lid on costs with fixed-price deals. SpaceX is known for being an efficient, low-cost supplier.3 But how was SpaceX able to win such well-funded contracts? Certainly, the company’s breakthrough technical expertise is one factor. However, its strict adherence to the space agency’s rigorous RFP standards and killer proposals have clinched the lucrative deals. Such success is the culmination of lengthy, intense effort, as one of the many NASA requests for proposals makes clear: “Each task has milestones with specified amounts and performance dates. Each mission requires complex preparation and several years of lead time.”4

Guffey, Mary Ellen; Loewy, Dana. Business Communication: Process & Product (p. 483). Cengage Learning. Kindle Edition.

error: Content is protected !!