Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Review the following the attached document for additional updates. All references are currently at | Max paper
  

Review the following the attached document for additional updates. 

All references are currently at the end of each section, these references need to be cut and pasted and moved to section 7 in the document. All references must be in alphabetical order. There are a couple of references that have volume numbers, please be sure to look up these references and add the volume number. The other updates needed are listed in the document with a note. Please see each of these and make the necessary updates. A lot of them is simply typing what’s in the comments in the appropriate secitons. 

Doctoral Project Plan (DPP)


SCHOOL OF COUNSELING AND HUMAN SERVICES

DOCTORAL PROJECT PLAN

STATEMENT OF ORIGINAL WORK

I understand that Capella University’s Academic Honesty Policy (3.01.01) holds learners accountable for the integrity of work they submit, which includes, but is not limited to, discussion postings, assignments, comprehensive exams, and the Capstone. Learners are expected to understand the policy and know that it is their responsibility to learn about instructor and general academic expectations concerning the proper citation of sources in written work as specified in the APA Publication Manual, 6th Ed. Serious sanctions can result from violations of any type of the Academic Honesty Policy, including dismissal from the university.

I attest that this document represents my work. Where I have used the ideas of others, I have paraphrased and given credit according to the guidelines of the APA Publication Manual, 6th Ed. Where I have used the words of others (i.e., direct quotes), I have followed the guidelines for using direct quotes prescribed by the APA Publication Manual, 6th Ed.

I have read, understood, and abided by Capella University’s Academic Honesty Policy (3.01.01). I further understand that Capella University takes plagiarism seriously; regardless of intention, the result is the same.

Signature for Statement of Original Work (MUST COMPLETE)
Learner Name

Ashley Cook

Mentor Name

Dr. Amy Lyndon

Learner Email

[email protected]

Mentor Email

[email protected]

Learner ID

1367748

Date

Capstone Project Plan Process

You will use this form to complete your keystone class, obtaining Milestone 1, and obtaining Milestone 2 approval. The goals of this process are: (1) facilitate the planning of the details of your doctoral research project, (2) allow for scientific merit review, and (3) facilitate your progress through the Capstone. You must obtain approval of your Doctoral Project Plan before seeking IRB approval, collecting data, and writing your Capstone manuscript. Approval of your Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) will satisfy the Capstone Milestone 2, indicating that the Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) has passed the scientific merit review part of the IRB process.

The scientific merit process is designed to ensure that a proposed research study contains an appropriate level of scientific rigor and merit before ethical review. Rigor is achieved if the study is well-designed and has adequate resources so that participants are not exposed to unnecessary harm. Merit is achieved if the rights and welfare of the human research participants are protected

**Obtaining Scientific Merit approval for the Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) does not guarantee you will obtain IRB approval. A detailed ethical review will be conducted during the process of IRB approval.

How to Use This Form

This Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) form is intended to help you plan the details of your Capstone Project. It provides a space for you to work out all the details of your design. Once you have obtained Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) approval, you should be able to easily expand on the information you have submitted here to complete the deliverable of your proposed Capstone Project and write the Capstone Final Report because these sections follow the outline of the Doctoral Capstone Report. It is recommended that you use this form in a step-by-step way to help you design your study. Expect that you will go through several revisions before obtaining approval of this form. Research planning is an iterative process; each revision often sparking the need for further revisions until everything is aligned. These iterations and revisions are a necessary and customary part of the research process.

Do’s and Don’ts

· Do use the correct form!

· Don’t lock the form. That will stop you from editing and revising the form.

· To complete the “Learner Information” and Section 1 first.

· Don’t skip items or sections. If an item does not apply to your study, type “NA” in its field.

· Don’t delete the descriptions and instructions in each section!

· Do read the item descriptions carefully. Items request very specific information. Be sure you understand what is asked.

· Do use primary sources to the greatest extent possible as references. Textbooks are NOT acceptable as the only references supporting methodological and design choices. Use textbooks to track down the primary sources.

· If you change any design elements after your DPP is approved, you must submit a revised Doctoral Project Plan. A current DPP must be on file before your IRB application is submitted.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS

Complete the following steps to prepare and submit your DPP for Scientific Merit Review (SMR) approval for your doctoral Capstone Project.

· Keystone Learners: Your Keystone Instructor will facilitate the initial process.

· Capstone Learners: Your Mentor will facilitate this process.


CITI Research Training

Mentees must complete the CITI Research training and submit their CITI completion certificate to your Keystone Instructor.


CITI Training Module


Milestone 1: Topic Approval

Complete Section 1 (1.1 and 1.2) of the DPP form for topic approval.

There are two ways to achieve Milestone 1:

1. If Section 1 of your DPP meets the rigor for a viable topic, your keystone instructor will submit it for school review. Receiving 80% on the DPP does not mean that it is ready for the topic plan review.

a. You will work on all sections of the DPP during the Keystone Course, even if you do not achieve topic approval. This will allow the Keystone Instructor to introduce you to the necessary components of the Doctoral Project Plan.

2. If Section 1 is not submitted for topic approval during the Keystone Course (HMSV8700), your Mentor will submit the topic plan in the Capstone Course – HMSV9971.


Milestones 2: Doctoral Project Plan

1. Work with your Capstone Mentor to complete and make any necessary refinements to the DPP form.

a. If you did not receive topic approval in the Keystone Course, you will refine sections 1 (1.1 and 1.2) and submit it to your Capstone Mentor. Your Capstone Mentor will submit section 1 for topic approval. After topic approval, you will proceed to step 2.

2. Once you have topic approval (whether in the Keystone or Capstone Course), you will refine and complete sections 2 – 7 in the DPP form. Make sure all sections are aligned with the DHS Programs of Professional Practice and the DHS Doctoral Capstone Handbook. —changes in one section could necessitate changes in another section.

3. After you have a polished version, you should review the DPP criteria with the rubric to ensure you have provided the required information to demonstrate you have met each of the scientific merit criteria.

4. Submit the completed form to your Capstone Mentor.


Scientific Merit Review(SMR)

The scientific merit reviewer will review each item against a rubric to determine whether you have met each of the criteria. You must meet all the criteria at a level of “Proficient” or greater to obtain reviewer approval. The reviewer will designate your Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) as one of the following:

· Approved

· Deferred

· Not Ready for Review

If the Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) is Deferred or Not Ready for Review:

· The SMR reviewer will provide feedback on any criteria that you have not met.

· You are required to make the necessary revisions and obtain approval for the revisions from your Mentor.

· Once you have Mentor approval for your revisions, your Mentor will submit your Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) for a second review.

· You will be notified if your Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) has been approved or deferred for revisions.

· Up to three attempts to obtain Scientific Merit Review (SMR) approval are allowed. Researchers, Mentors, and Reviewers should make every possible attempt to resolve issues before the Doctoral Project Plan (DPP) is deferred for the third time. If a learner does not pass the scientific merit review on the third attempt, then the case will be referred to the Research Chair and/or Program Chair in your School for review, evaluation, and intervention.

· While you await approval of your Doctoral Project Plan (DPP), you should begin working on your Ethics Paper. Your Mentor has a template for you to follow.

· Once you have gained approval on your DPP (Milestone 2), you are ready to submit your Ethics Paper and IRB application and supporting documents for review by the IRB Committee.


Milestone 3: IRB Approval

1. Once you obtain SMR approval, you will begin and complete an eight to 10-page ethics paper. This paper is a conceptual analysis of ethical principles typically related to all professional Capstone Projects. Your Mentor has a template for you to follow.

2. Once your Mentor has approved your Ethics Paper, you will complete your IRB application through IRBManager and submit any accompanying materials.

3. Consult the Research and Scholarship area within iGuide for IRB forms and detailed process directions.

**You are required to obtain scientific merit approval (SMR) before you may receive IRB approval. Obtaining SMR approval does not guarantee that IRB approval will follow.


Milestone 4: Pre-Data Collection Call

1. Once you have gained approval from the IRB, you are ready to schedule your Pre-Data Collection Conference Call. You may not proceed to data collection until you have completed this call.

2. Work with your Mentor and Doctoral Committee to set a date for the conference call.

3. Upon successful completion of the Pre-Data Collection Conference Call, your Mentor will mark Milestone 4 complete, and you may proceed with data collection.

Learner and Specialization Information

(MUST BE COMPLETED)

Learners, please insert your answers directly into the expandable boxes that have been provided.

Learner Name

Ashley Cook

Learner Email

[email protected]

Learner ID Number

1367748

Mentor Name

Mentor Email

Specialization (check one)

|_| Leadership and Organizational Management

|X| Program Evaluation and Data Analytics

Specialization Chair Name

Specialization Chair Email

Committee Member #1 Name

Committee Member #1 Email

Committee Member #2 Name

Committee Member #2 Email

Capstone Type (check one)

|_| Research Paper

|X| Professional Product

Deliverable (check one)

Research Paper

|_| Action Research Monograph

|_| Program Evaluation

Professional Product

|X| Service Project

|_| Change Management Plan

Section 1. Topic Endorsement Comment by Elissa Dawkins: Hi Ashley,

Thank you for submitting your topic. Currently, it is DEFERRED. Please see my comments throughout 1.1 and 1.2.

Please do not delete my comments and turn on track changes so that I can see the changes that you have made when you resubmit.

Thanks!

Dr. Dawkins
3/11/2021

Please, use single-spaced, Times Roman 11 pt. throughout the form – the boxes will expand as you input text.

1.1 Capstone Topic (2 paragraphs)

Clearly describe the topic of the Capstone Project.

This section should include:

· FIRST PARAGRAPH: State the topic of the capstone project. The topic statement should include the problem or opportunity for improvement in the project. The concepts of the topic must be clear and focused and well supported in the literature.

· Begin this paragraph with, “The topic is…”

· SECOND PARAGRAPH: Describe the significance of this topic to Human Services AND the specialization within your program. Include a statement about the practical implications of the project by describing the impact of this Capstone Project on the organization or community of interest. Comment by Elissa Dawkins: The second paragraph of 1.1 does not discuss what is needed as described here.

Example – The topic of this capstone project is the effectiveness of a transitional summer program, Helping Others, Inc., on middle school student’s chance of success (graduation) in high school.

The topic should be correctly formed:

· The topic should be appropriate for the specialization.

· The topic should use appropriate language for key concepts/phenomena.

· The type of action proposed should be specified.

· The community of interest/organization/program or community and target population should be named.

· The concepts should be appropriately focus

· The topic should be supported by at least ten (10) citations.

· The topic should be in alignment with current literature and the DHS Programs of Professional Practice.

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

The topic of this capstone project is improving The Haven’s ability to assist victims in establishing their independent financial ability. The Haven looks at making the current housing more reasonably priced, building improved, and low moderate-income houses using the existing building materials to help create a community where every person can live in (The Haven (valdostaharven.org). The Haven is a local non-profit agency that provides emergency temporary shelter and services to victims of family violence and sexual assault. The Haven is dual-programmed and has two emergency facilities: The Battered Women’s Shelter, which serves victims of family violence, and the Rape Crisis Center, which serves victims of sexual assault. Both programs have a 24-hour toll-free crisis line, staffed by trained personnel, that is available to anyone wishing to utilize the emergency facilities or the Outreach Programs (The Haven, valdostaharven.org). This capstone will explore domestic violence and economic or financial abuse as the background for creating training protocol on financial literacy for domestic violence victims for use by The Haven. Financial impediments play a major role in restricting the freedoms enjoyed by women who are abused by their intimate partners (Juing et al., 2021). A batterer is empowered by his partner’s financial dependence, and a woman’s autonomy is diminished by her abuser’s financial control. Moreover, financial instability is one of the greatest reasons why, after gaining freedom, a woman who experiences battering has limited choices and may ultimately acquiesce to her partner’s attempts to reconcile (Ortiz-Ospina, & Roser, 2017). Economic instability is a link that binds a woman to her abuser (Carla Moretti 2017). Regardless of the interventions, law enforcement, family, friends, or The Haven, as long as she remains financially dependent upon her abuser, it is exceedingly difficult for a woman who experiences intimate partner violence to stop the batterer’s control. Economic independence can provide freedom from abuse (Bramley & Fitzpatrick,2018).

The significance of this topic to human service is to educate people, research more information about the issue of domestic violence and sexual assault. The information gathered in this research would help the program to be in a better position to help the affected people. The impact of this project is to people of the community of interest live without fear by helping victims of domestic violence and sexual assaults together with their families escape abuse and can create safer lives. Through this capstone topic, the aim is to completely eradicate sexual assault and domestic violence as well as empower people with financial literacy that would help them in their lives.

Most victims experience some type of financial abuse, which reduces their financial literacy. Thus, they will need assistance with maintaining the long-term shelter. Without having many organizations that are willing to take care of the plight the people are facing, the goals of the human services field would not be easily fulfilled (Juing et al., 2021). Human service programs can help victims through the programs that have been put in place along with hotlines that are focused directly on these issues. Housing is among the three most essential life requirements. Haven helps victims who have been financially abused by building a healthy, empowering, and strengthening them by looking into what is the cause of the situation and how they can come up with an idea that can change it (Soibatian, 2017). The Haven has many programs like housing, children support, women support groups, income, and employment service groups. The supporting services try to assist the individuals with materials and supplies that will help the individuals with low income to have daily needs. The victims sometimes are helped by social workers or churches that focus on stabilizing them and creating a budget that will finance the living (Jennifer, Patrick, 2011). However, it is projected that over one billion people are today living in insufficient housing conditions in urban areas. “In most cities, there are more than half of the population who lives in informal settlements in what can be described as life and health-threatening” (Ortiz-Ospina & Roser, 2017, p 3). More than 100 million people are homeless globally, and data shows that there are increasing propositions of women and children. The statistics given give a clear picture of the dire need for having quality housing globally.

It is indisputable that homelessness continues to be a grand challenge in our country and globally. In addressing the problem of homelessness, our organization has been putting up measures to ensure that we prevent people from becoming homeless in the first place. This includes outreach efforts targeting at-risk people in short-term case management (Moretti, 2017).

 References Comment by Amy Lyndon: Move ALL references to section 7 and put in alphabetical order.

Bramley, G., & Fitzpatrick, S. (2018). Homelessness in the UK: who is most at risk? Housing Studies33(1), 96-116.
https://doi.org/10.1080/02673037.2017.1344957

Carla Moretti (2017) Social housing mediation: Education path for social workers, European Journal of Social Work, 20(3), 429-440. DOI: 
10.1080/13691457.2017.1314934

Dunn, M., Rawson, M., & Rogers, A. (2021). Rural housing: Competition and choice (3rd ed.). Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003132950

Gan, X., Zuo, J., Wu, P., Wang, J., Chang, R., & Wen, T. (2017). How does affordable housing become more sustainable? A stakeholder study. Journal of Cleaner Production162, 427-437.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.06.048

Juing, H., Jaime, J., & Lee, S. (2021). Mental health in subsidized housing: Readiness to assist residents with mental health issues In Subsidized Housing From The Perspectives Of Housing Employees. Qualitative Social Work. https://doi.org/10.1177%2f14733250211027630

Kottke, T., Abariotes, A., & Spoonheim, J. B. (2018). Access to affordable housing promotes health and well-being and reduces hospital visits. The Permanente Journal22.

Muir, K., Moran, M., Michaux, F., Findlay, S., Meltzer, A., Mason, C., & Heaney, R. A. (2017). The opportunities, risks, and possibilities of social impact investment for housing and homelessness. Ng, K., & Neo, Y. (2019). Housing Problems and Social Work Advocacy in a Home-Owning Society. Journal of Social service Research, 46(5), 671-684.

Ortiz-Ospina, E., & Roser, M. (2017). Homelessness. Our World in Data.
Homelessness – Our World in Data

Polvere, L., Barness, C., & Lee, E. (2018). Housing needs of grandparent caregivers: grandparent, youth, and professional perspectives. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 61(5).
https://doi.org/10.1080/01634372.2018.1454566

Jennifer, Patrick. (2011). The Role of Financial Education in Improved Housing. https://www.findevgateway.org/sites/default/files/publications/files/mfg-en-paper-the-role-of-financial-education-in-improved-housing-jun-2011.pdf.

1.2 Research Problem (2 Paragraphs)

Write a brief statement of the problem or need for improvement at the capstone site or program. Clearly describe the gap in current practice, service, process, policy, and/or the identified outcome. Identify the performance gap you wish to close and the potential root causes of the problem.

This section should include:

· FIRST PARAGRAPH: Write a brief statement that fully describes the problem being addressed. This paragraph introduces the problem that is informing the research and warrants the need for this study.

· Begin this paragraph with the statement, “The problem is…”

Example: The problem is that Helping Others, Inc’s transitional summer program has not consistently improved high school graduation rates.

· SECOND PARAGRAPH: Identify the need for the study. The need should be directly related to the problem presented in the first paragraph. It must identify a gap in current practice, service, process, policy, or programs. It must identify the need for the research and the desired outcome.

Example: This study is needed because high school graduation rates are decreasing in the service community where Helping Others Inc. provides its transitional summer program. Decreased graduation rates have negatively affected the unemployment rate in the area.

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

The problem is that the victims of domestic violence lack financial literacy and knowledge to retain long-term housing. The human services field increasingly recognizes economic and financial abuse within intimate partner relationships (Shinn, & Khadduri, 2020); for this reason, the human services field has worked continuously to develop financial empowerment programs to empower survivors for their financial future (Sikorska, 2021). The problem is domestic violence and intimate partner violence (IPV) victims struggle with financial independence. In recent years, researchers have come to recognize economic and financial abuse as a unique form of abuse commonly used by IPV perpetrators to gain and maintain control over their victims (Polvere, Barness, & Lee, 2018). Broadly defined, financial abuse includes behavior’s that control a victim’s “ability to acquire, use, and maintain resources thus threatening her economic security and potential for self-sufficiency” (Adams et al., 2008, p. 564) and is frequently a precursor to physical abuse. For example, Adams (2011) reported that 99% of IPV victims experience financial abuse. Similarly, Postmus et al. (2012) reported that 94% of the IPV survivors they surveyed experienced some form of financial abuse. The Haven can provide short-term housing needs to victims for up to three months, but once the short-term shelter ends, victims struggle with maintaining the housing independently (The Haven (valdostaharven.org). Many victims suffer because their credit scores have been destroyed by their partners or simply because of a lack of knowledge. Partners often destroy victims’ credit by harassing them to use their social security numbers. Victims are not able to retrieve this information of their resources because many of the abusers closely monitor the websites that they will visit. The lack of financial security is brought by a lack of access to safety, so the housing takes the initiative of educating the victims on how to secure their homes (Robin & Osub,2020).

The Haven explores a variety of options through local resources and the needs of the victims (MacKenzie et al., 2020). This helps The Haven address the most affected people and use the available local resources, making access to affordable houses easier (Polvere et al., 2018). The major goal is to ensure that everybody can live in a house that is decent and affordable (Benerjee & Bhattacharya, 2020)

In response, this capstone is needed because financial literacy training is needed to help survivors of domestic violence to gain financial independence. Yet a major deficiency in the debate is empirical evidence that the proposed interventions, which seek to empower women, so that they may be less likely to return to an abuser if they are to stay financially independent. This capstone fills the gap by developing training to improve the financial literacy of domestic violence victims. Given the sample, the domestic violence rate is 185 incidents per 100,000 population annually (Shinn, & Khadduri, 2020), these estimates suggest improving financial literacy can prevent between 6 to 20 domestic violence incidents per 100,000 population from occurring each year. This capstone will show how improving women’s financial literacy can significantly reduce domestic violence. First, financial literacy in the female population is significantly lower compared to the male population – i.e., the gender gap in financial literacy (Fonseca et al., 2012; Hasler & Lusardi, 2017; Lusardi & Mitchell, 2008, 2014). This inequality makes women susceptible to financial abuse by their partners. Therefore, improving financial literacy can help women be aware of and identify financial abuse when it first happens, and stop the cycle of violence. That is conditional on women’s income level, by closing the gap in financial knowledge and preventing financial abuse, financial literacy re-establishes women’s economic independence and bargaining position in the partnership, which in turn reduces domestic violence.

References

Bramley, G., & Fitzpatrick, S. (2018). Homelessness in the UK: who is most at risk?. Housing Studies33(1), 96-116.

Benerjee, D., & Bhattacharya, P. (2020). The hidden vulnerability of homelessness in the Covid-19 pandemic: Perspectives from India. International Journal Of Social Psychiatry.

https://doi.org/10.1177%2f0020764020922890

Bullock, H., Reppond, H., Truong, S., Singh, M. (2020). An intersectional analysis of the feminization of homelessness and mothers’ housing precarity. Journal of Social Issues, 76(4), 835-858.
https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12406

Fowler, P., Hovmand, P., Marcal, K., & Das, S. (2019). Solving homelessness from a complex systems perspective: Insights for prevention responses. Annual Review of Public Health, 40, 465-486.
https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-publhealth-040617-013553

Fonseca, R., Mullen, K. J., Zamarro, G., and Zissimopoulos, J. (2012). What explains the gender gap in financial literacy? the role of household decision-making. Journal of Consumer Affairs, 46(1), 90–106.

Gan, X., Zuo, J., Wu, P., Wang, J., Chang, R., & Wen, T. (2017). How does affordable housing become more sustainable? A stakeholder study. Journal of Cleaner Production162, 427-437.

Kottke, T., Abariotes, A., & Spoonheim, J. B. (2018). Access to affordable housing promotes health and well-being and reduces hospital visits. The Permanente Journal22. retrieved from:
Access to Affordable Housing Promotes Health and Well-Being and Reduces Hospital Visits (nih.gov)

Lima, N., Souza, R., Feitos, P., Moreira, J., Silva, C., & Neto, M. (2020). People experiencing homelessness: Their potential exposure to Covid-19. Psychiatry Research, 288.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112945

Mackenzie, O., Trimbur, C., & Vanjani, R. (2020). An isolation hotel for people experiencing homelessness. The New England Journal of Medicine, 383(41). DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc2022860

Morton, M., Dworsky, A., Matjasko, J., & Curry, S. (2018). Prevalence and correlates of youth homelessness in the United States. Journal Of Adolescent Health, 62(1)

Muir, K., Moran, M., Michaux, F., Findlay, S., Meltzer, A., Mason, C., … & Heaney, R. A. (2017). The opportunities, risks, and possibilities of social impact investment for housing and homelessness. retrieved from:
The Opportunities, Risks, and Possibilities of Social Impact Investment for Housing and Homelessness by Kristy Muir, Michael Moran, Fabienne Michaux, Suzanne Findlay, Ariella Meltzer, Chris Mason, Ioana Ramia, Richard A. Heaney:: SSRN

Ortiz-Ospina, E., & Roser, M. (2017). Homelessness. Our World in Data.

Polvere, L., Barness, C., & Lee, E. (2018). Housing needs of grandparent caregivers: grandparent, youth, and professional perspectives. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 61(5).
https://doi.org/10.1080/01634372.2018.1454566

Sikorska, A. (2021). Housing Law in Poland-From the Cooperative Model to Flat Ownership. Sustainable Housing. DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.986444

Shinn, M., & Khadduri, J. (2020). Amid Plenty: Homelessness and What to do About it. Wiley

Quests, G., Duggan, A., & Cooper, G. (2016). A Gender Lens on Affordable Housing. Re: gender.

https://www.icrw.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/gender_lens_on_affordable_housing_by_regender_final-1.pdf

Robin, B. & Osub, A. (2020). Ensuring Domestic Violence Survivors’ Safety.

https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/women/reports/2020/08/10/489068/ensuring-

domestic-violence-survivors-safety/

Learners

Specialization Chair Topic Approval

· After completing Section 1, Keystone or Capstone Learners should submit the DPP form to your Keystone Instructor or Capstone Mentor for approval.

· Collaborate with your Keystone Instructor or Capstone Mentor until you have approval for Section 1, “Topic Approval.”

· After you have received your Mentor’s approval for Section 1, your form will be submitted for SMR review.

|X| Approved



|_| Deferred

|_| Not Ready For Review

Reviewer Name: Dr. Elissa Dawkins

Reviewer signature: Elissa Dawkins

Date: 3/13/2021

Comments: Thank you for submitting your topic plan for review. Your topic is approved. Please review my comments above. In addition, you will need to obtain newer, primary references to support your topic. You will need to include scholarly literature to back up the need for the program evaluation. Schedule some time with a librarian and the writing center to tweak this.

Section 2. Rationale for Study

2.1 Capstone Project Problem Background

This section should further expound on the research problem and will include a SUMMARY of the review and synthesis of the research literature on the topic. This should include citations from at least 15 Articles but should indicate that you have performed a full review of the literature on the topic.

This section should include:

· A statement about the body of existing literature on the topic.

· A summary of recent research findings on the topic highlights the most relevant findings of the proposed study.

· A demonstration of how the proposed research could add to the existing literature on the topic.

Be sure to provide appropriate in-text citations and include references in the reference section.

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

*This will not be your Capstone Project literature review but an initial foundation. You will continue to add to your literature review throughout your Capstone.

Financial literacy means the victims could understand and use various financial skills effectively (Kottke et al., 2018). Financial literacy will lead to overall financial well-being, it is a lifelong journey of learning and is the foundation of the relationship that the victims will have with their money. (Khan, & Brewer, 2021). One-way victims can learn to help themselves obtain a normal life is by using the money given as the funding to help individuals start businesses and show them how to manage (Birkenmaier & Sherraden, 2013).  Financial education provides victims with budgeting skills, the know-how to balance checkbooks, understanding how to prevent identity theft, and understanding the lending activity, and knowing how to manage their debts. (Poby, 2009). Women are not given enough opportunities and properties that would help them live a comfortable life and support their children (Bramley & Fitzpatrick, 2018). Such programs also help them to get a stable job and can get insurance through them (Kottke et al., 2018).

Strong leadership is very important in helping in effectively engaging the public and surmounting barriers that are met while enhancing affordable housing. Strong leadership can motivate and inspire people to reach financial independence (Kottke, Abariotes,& Spoonheim, 2018). Financial literacy gives people the ability to understand the financial skills that would help them fix their problems. Financial literacy can help people to manage their money and finances effectively and afford their housing. (Katula, 2012). Many people have limited knowledge of investing that leads them to make poor financial decisions. Many people struggle with investing and saving due to a lack of financial literacy (Bullock et al., 2020). It requires addressing two very great challenges: defining the problem and creating a very strong and long-lasting solution (Fowler et al., 2019). Leaders are required to articulate and create a compelling vision for the solution to the housing problem. If this is not ensured, the affordable housing efforts may get lost among the competing needs of the community (Mackenzie et al., 2020). Therefore, the leaders have a great role in assuring that their cause receives the attention that it deceives as well as the necessary funding for the program. (Quests, Duggan, & Cooper, 2016).

If a program is sufficiently funded, it would mean that the chances of more people benefiting from the program increase. Women are more affected by gender violence than are men (Bullock et al., 2020). Many female IPV victims are left stranded after domestic violence with nowhere to go, some with limited or no financial literacy to manage their finances (Bramley & Fitzpatrick, 2018). Women are more affected by IPV, The female victims of IPV, especially domestic violence. This is the group that needs significant help regarding financial literacy (Benerjee & Bhattacharya, 2020).

References

Birkenmaier, J., & Sherraden, M. (2013). Financial education and capability: Research, education, policy, and practice. Oxford University Press.

Finley, S. Y. (2021). Financial literacy, financial liberation. Financialization, Financial Literacy, and Social Education, 113-127. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003020264-7 Comment by Amy Lyndon: Volume #?

Hoge, G. L., Stylianou, A. M., Postmus, J. L., & Johnson, L. (2019). Domestic violence/Intimate partner violence and issues of financial abuse and control: What does financial empowerment look like? The Routledge Handbook on Financial Social Work, 15-25. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351165686-3

Jarecke, J., Taylor, E. W., & Hira, T. K. (2014). Financial literacy education for women. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 2014(141), 37-46. https://doi.org/10.1002/ace.20083

Katula, S. L. (2012). Creating a haven for employees who are victims of domestic violence. Nursing Forum, 47(4), 217-225. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-6198.2012.00278.x

Khan, R., & Brewer, G. (2021). Financial abuse and control of siblings. The SAGE Handbook of Domestic Violence, 794-808. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781529742343.n48

Ngo, P. T., & Puente Moncayo, D. (2021). Can financial literacy reduce domestic violence? SSRN Electronic Journal. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3809469 Comment by Amy Lyndon: Volume #, page #s?

Poby, K. E. (2009). Women’s financial future: A financial literacy program for incarcerated women.

Sanders, C. K. (2013). Financial capability among survivors of domestic violence. Financial Capability and Asset Development, 84-107. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199755950.003.0024

Voices from the group: Domestic violence offenders’ experience of the intervention. (2013). Intimate Violence, 329-342. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203049594-15

Bramley, G., & Fitzpatrick, S. (2018). Homelessness in the UK: who is most at risk? Housing Studies33(1), 96-116.

Benerjee, D., & Bhattacharya, P. (2020). The hidden vulnerability of homelessness in the Covid-19 pandemic: Perspectives from India. International Journal of Social Psychiatry.


https://doi.org/10.1177%2f0020764020922890
Comment by Amy Lyndon: Volume #, page #s?

Bullock, H., Reppond, H., Truong, S., & Singh, M. (2020). An intersectional analysis of the feminization of homelessness and mothers’ housing precarity. Journal of Social Issues, 76(4), 835-858.
https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12406

Fowler, P., Hovmand, P., Marcal, K., & Das, S. (2019). Solving homelessness from a complex systems perspective: Insights for prevention responses. Annual Review of Public Health, 40, 465-486.
https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-publhealth-040617-013553

Gan, X., Zuo, J., Wu, P., Wang, J., Chang, R., & Wen, T. (2017). How does affordable housing become more sustainable? A stakeholder study. Journal of Cleaner Production162, 427-437.

Kottke, T., Abariotes, A., & Spoonheim, J. B. (2018). Access to affordable housing promotes health and well-being and reduces hospital visits. The Permanente Journal22. Access to Affordable Housing Promotes Health and Well-Being and Reduces Hospital Visits (nih.gov) Comment by Amy Lyndon: Page #s? Comment by Amy Lyndon: If this is a journal, you just need the DOI. What’s the NIH.gov link?.

Lima, N., Souza, R., Feitos, P., Moreira, J., Silva, C., & Neto, M. (2020). People Experiencing Homelessness: Their Potential Exposure To Covid-19. Psychiatry Research, 288.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112945

Mackenzie, O., Trimbur, C., & Vanjani, R. (2020). An Isolation Hotel For People Experiencing Homelessness. The New England Journal Of Medicine, 383(41). DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc2022860

Morton, M., Dworsky, A., Matjasko, J., & Curry, S. (2018). Prevalence And Correlates Of Youth Homelessness In The United States. Journal Of Adolescent Health, 62(1)

Muir, K., Moran, M., Michaux, F., Findlay, S., Meltzer, A., Mason, C., … & Heaney, R. A. (2017). The opportunities, risks, and possibilities of social impact investment for housing and homelessness. retrieved from:
The Opportunities, Risks, and Possibilities of Social Impact Investment for Housing and Homelessness by Kristy Muir, Michael Moran, Fabienne Michaux, Suzanne Findlay, Ariella Meltzer, Chris Mason, Ioana Ramia, Richard A. Heaney:: SSRN

Oliver, R., Alexander, B., Roe, S., & Wlasny, M. (2019). The economic and social costs of domestic abuse.
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/918897/horr107.pdf
.

Ortiz-Ospina, E., & Roser, M. (2017). Homelessness. Our World in Data.
https://ourworldindata.org/homlessness?source=post_page

Polvere, L., Barness, C., & Lee, E. (2018). Housing needs of grandparent caregivers: grandparent, youth, and professional perspectives. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 61(5).
https://doi.org/10.1080/01634372.2018.1454566

Shinn, M., & Khadduri, J. (2020). Amid Plenty: Homelessness and What to do About it. Wiley

Quests, G., Duggan, A., & Cooper, G. (2016). A Gender Lens on Affordable Housing. Re:gender.https://www.icrw.org/wpcontent/uploads/2016/11/gender_lens_on_affordable_housing_by_regender_final-1.pdf

2.2 Need for the Project and Evidence to Make Change

Provide a rationale supported by current information regarding the need for this Capstone Project.

This section should include:

· The results of a needs assessment or an analysis for the project.

· A description of issues identified in the workplace, project, or community.

· Any relevant population and organizational demographics and statistics related to the proposed Capstone Project.

· A description of why the study is important.

· A description of whom the study will benefit.

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

For financial planning for their clients, The Haven gathers financial information of their clients. They conduct a financial survey to analyze the collected data, the data is summarized based on the goals of the clients. The plan also involves meeting in person to discuss and review the plans to make a recommendation for short and long-term goals achievements. The Haven’s financial plans to their clients give the clients options to consider their way forward based on their goals and objectives. The client is helped to stay organized and help them complete the tasks that are in alignment with their goals. This may include helping the victims to escape the abuse and create safer lives for themselves ( Muir, et al, 2017).

Most of the women The Haven helps struggle after divorce because they may have been used to stay-at-home mothers and also limited financial literacy After divorce, most women have no savings and are left on their own. Even after divorce, women struggle with legal and financial issues (Polvere et al., 2018). The research will help The Haven get more information and data to work with improving victims’ ability to maintain their housing, along with other financial benefits. (Quests, Duggan, & Cooper, 2016).

The Haven looks at various options through local resources and the needs of the victims (Mackenzie et al, 2020). This helps Haven address the most affected people and use the available local resources, making the construction of affordable houses easier (Muir et al., 2017). The major goal is to ensure that everybody can live in a house that is decent and affordable (Sikorska, 2021). “The problem requires to be addressed urgently so that communities can have an effective, caring system for providing to the needs of the homeless people” (Gan et al., 2017, p.23).

Through proper leadership and the training protocol I look to incorporate, The Haven helps the victims of domestic violence and sexual assault to acquire financial literacy that would enable to perfectly manage their finance and budget.( Polvere,Barness,& Lee,2018). This would include them being able to pay for their houses and other daily expenses. Financial literacy would be a tool that would assist the victims to be able financially independent and live better livesand ensure that the problem of homelessness is addressed (Quests, et al., 2016). Housing can be considered to be affordable if it is below 30% of the total income. According to the Housing department and urban development, if a family pays for a how for more than 30%, this becomes a burden to the family. This gives a clear picture of the dire need for having quality housing globally (Ortiz-Ospina, & Roser, 2017). Most importantly, the rapid urbanization necessitates more access to housing as more than half of humanity is now living in the cities (Morton, et al., 2018). It is important examining the ways of enhancing the quality of housing, which means ensuring that everybody is capable of finding a safe, decent, and affordable house within the areas where they work, shop, study, and play (Kottke, et al., 2018)

References

Bramley, G., & Fitzpatrick, S. (2018). Homelessness in the UK: who is most at risk?. Housing Studies33(1), 96-116. retrieved from:
Full article: Homelessness in the UK: who is most at risk? (tandfonline.com)

Benerjee, D., & Bhattacharya, P. (2020). The Hidden Vulnerability Of Homelessness In The Covid-19 Pandemic: Perspectives From India. International Journal Of Social Psychiatry.

https://doi.org/10.1177%2f0020764020922890

Bullock, H., Reppond, H., Truong, S., Singh, M. (2020). An intersectional analysis of the feminization of homelessness and mothers’ housing precarity. Journal of Social Issues, 76(4), 835-858.
https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12406

Fowler, P., Hovmand, P., Marcal, K., & Das, S. (2019). Solving Homelessness from a Complex Systems Perspective: Insights for Prevention Responses. Annual Review of Public Health, 40, 465-486.
https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-publhealth-040617-013553

Gan, X., Zuo, J., Wu, P., Wang, J., Chang, R., & Wen, T. (2017). How does affordable housing become more sustainable? A stakeholder study. Journal of Cleaner Production162, 427-437. retrieved from:
How does affordable housing become more sustainable? A stakeholder study – ScienceDirect

Kottke, T., Abariotes, A., & Spoonheim, J. B. (2018). Access to affordable housing promotes health and well-being and reduces hospital visits. The Permanente Journal22. retrieved from:
Access to Affordable Housing Promotes Health and Well-Being and Reduces Hospital Visits (nih.gov)

Lima, N., Souza, R., Feitos, P., Moreira, J., Silva, C., & Neto, M. (2020). People Experiencing Homelessness: Their Potential Exposure To Covid-19. Psychiatry Research, 288.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112945

Mackenzie, O., Trimbur, C., & Vanjani, R. (2020). An Isolation Hotel For People Experiencing Homelessness. The New England Journal Of Medicine, 383(41). DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc2022860

Morton, M., Dworsky, A., Matjasko, J., & Curry, S. (2018). Prevalence And Correlates Of Youth Homelessness In The United States. Journal Of Adolescent Health, 62(1)

Muir, K., Moran, M., Michaux, F., Findlay, S., Meltzer, A., Mason, C., … & Heaney, R. A. (2017). The opportunities, risks, and possibilities of social impact investment for housing and homelessness.
The Opportunities, Risks, and Possibilities of Social Impact Investment for Housing and Homelessness by Kristy Muir, Michael Moran, Fabienne Michaux, Suzanne Findlay, Ariella Meltzer, Chris Mason, Ioana Ramia, Richard A. Heaney:: SSRN

Ortiz-Ospina, E., & Roser, M. (2017). Homelessness. Our World in Data. retrieved from:
Homelessness – Our World in Data

Polvere, L., Barness, C., & Lee, E. (2018). Housing needs of grandparent caregivers: grandparent, youth, and professional perspectives. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 61(5).
https://doi.org/10.1080/01634372.2018.1454566

Sikorska, A. (2021). Housing Law in Poland-From the Cooperative Model to Flat Ownership. Sustainable Housing. DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.986444

Shinn, M., & Khadduri, J. (2020). Amid Plenty: Homelessness and What to do About it. Wiley

Quests, G., Duggan, A., & Cooper, G. (2016). A Gender Lens on Affordable Housing. Re: gender.

https://www.icrw.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/gender_lens_on_affordable_housing_by_regender_final-1.pdf

2.3 Theoretical Foundations

Briefly describe the primary theoretical framework or model to be used for the study that will serve as the lens through which you will view the research problem and research questions.

NOTE: The theoretical foundation should be a theory from your discipline that supports the topic and should reflect on how you understand the topic and constructs in the study. To select the theory of model for the study, review the DHS Programs of Professional Practice.

This section should include:

· A review or discussion of the theory that will guide the project.

· An explanation of how the theory or model defines the variables or constructs of the study.

· An explanation of how the theory or model will guide the study.

· A list and explanation of any study assumptions.

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

Economic empowerment theory will be used in the study and will also serve as a lens through which the research problems and research questions will be viewed (Baumol, 1977). This theory will work to achieve the goal of empowering women and especially the victims and the survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault by empowering them with financial literacy and also with affordable housing. Economic empowerment theory has changed since the 1970s where the theory has set a path towards gender equality, economic growth, and eradication of poverty. People have been empowered to make better decisions and take risks to increase their income through investing and budgeting their finances. The road to financial independence has been made more clear. The survivors and the victims will be empowered to heal and engage in the community. Financial literacy will enable women to have better lives and to an extent prevent sexual assault. Economic empowerment theory involves promoting women in their social and economic development. This means simply giving power to women (Karaa, 2019), giving financial literacy to women by helping them to manage their finances. Domestic violence victims will have the ability to decide for their own lives and make decisions based on their objectives and their goals. Most domestic violence is because of the traditional marriages where the man has all the power over the woman and men control all the finances in homes (Lee, 2017). In addition, traditional gender roles where women were expected to be just stay-at-home moms and were not mostly involved in the financial decisions (Hejase, 2018). Women have been for a long time been denied personal control over their finances. This is one of the main reasons that women struggle after divorce to get affordable houses and manage their finances since they have no experience with finance as compared to men. Economic empowerment to women removes the constraints to lack of opportunities for their development and their confinement to household environments (Hejase, 2018).

The Haven gives financial education to women to help them overcome the homeless problem. Haven gives personal attention to ensure that they have paramount success in their finances. They give investment advice to their clients that are personalized based on their financial goals.

The study assumptions of the study are that all women are not financially literate and that men have more financial literacy as compared to women. In society, most of the finances are handled by men.

The other assumption is that all women struggle to get affordable houses and manage their finances after divorce. It is assumed that most women are confined to home duties in the household environments. (Lu, 2021).

References

Baumol, W. J. (1977). Economic theory and operations analysis. Prentice-Hall.

Hejase, H. (2018). Review of “Economic empowerment of women in Lebanon”. 
https://doi.org/10.14322/publons.r2552376

Hoge, G. L., Stylianou, A. M., Postmus, J. L., & Johnson, L. (2019). Domestic violence/intimate partner violence and issues of financial abuse and control: What does financial empowerment look like? The Routledge Handbook on Financial Social Work, 15-25. 
https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351165686-3

Huston, S., & Baines, R. (2019). Sustainable management of affordable housing. Greening Affordable Housing, 18-31. 
https://doi.org/10.1201/b22317-2

Huyugüzel Kişla, G. (2019). Women empowerment in the time of crisis. Women’s Economic Empowerment in Turkey, 28-42. 
https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429053153-3

Islahi, A. A. (2020). Economic empowerment of women in Islam. Economic Empowerment of Women in the Islamic World, 21-38. 
https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811212154_0002

Karaa, İ. E. (2019). Does family democratization explain the financial literacy of women? Women’s Economic Empowerment in Turkey, 91-112. 
https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429053153-8

Lee, R. A. (2017). The affordable option: Charlotte Street manufactured housing. The Unsheltered Woman, 277-282. 
https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351302203-22

Lu, S. (2021). Financial literacy education program post-financial housing crisis. Research Anthology on Personal Finance and Improving Financial Literacy, 504-517. 
https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-7998-8049-3.ch027

Sanders, C. K. (2013). Financial capability among survivors of domestic violence. Financial Capability and Asset Development, 84-107. 
https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199755950.003.0024

Willison, C. E. (2021). America’s homelessness crisis. Ungoverned and Out of Sight, 1-15. 
https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780197548325.003.0001

Yamawaki, N., Riley, C., & Gardner, N. (2018). The effects of gender-role traditionality and gender of abuser on attitudes toward intimate partner violence and perceived body size of the victim and abuser. Partner Abuse9(3), 230-248. 
https://doi.org/10.1891/1946-6560.9.3.230

2.4 Researchers Positionality

In this section, you will define your role, position, and how positionality will impact your research study.

This section should include:

· The title of your role or position in the organization, program, or community in your site.

· A description of your job duties at the site.

· A description of how your position will impact the research project.

· A statement that identifies if you are an insider (work or volunteer with the organization) or outsider, or a collaborator with insiders (no affiliation, but working with stakeholders within the organization).

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

Current position: Non-affiliated community researcher

My current position with The Haven is as a non-affiliated community researcher, in hopes of becoming a volunteer for the organization. Volunteers with The Haven help the organization improve the quality of victims’ care and support in their day-to-day operations and assist victims with immediate needs. Volunteer tasks may include assisting victims with housing needs, literature reviews, completing applications, filing papers, assisting staff with errands, and other miscellaneous things that can be assigned to help the Haven run smoothly.

I have no affiliation with The Haven at this time but will be applying with the organization as a human service volunteer in hopes of being able to provide financial literacy training to victims. The training will be another resource that The Haven will be able to provide to all victims that are serviced through the Haven.

2.5 Practical Implications

Please describe the specific practical implications of your findings that can be used by the stakeholders.

This section should include:

· Minimum of (2) paragraphs. Every statement must be supported by the literature

· A description of the specific practical implications (who may benefit) from the research that can be used by any or all of the following stakeholders:

· the population being studied,

· practitioners, clinicians, or medical practitioners,

· community-based service providers or health organizations,

· educators, colleges/universities or

· the wider community itself.

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

REMEMBER

NOTE: Be cognizant of the limitations and scope of the proposed research. Do not promise practical implications that are beyond the scope of the research.

The practical implication of the population being studied which includes the clients of Haven and the practitioners is that they benefit from the findings of the research. The information from the research will help the practitioners to make the right decisions. They will have more data and information and be in a better place to help the victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. The Haven foundation aims at the treatment and prevention of sexual assault and domestic violence. With the information from this research, the medical practitioners and clinicians will know the best way to deal with the patients and the victims.

For the community-based service providers and healthcare organizations, the findings from the research will help them in creating a community and a home for the victims as well as happiness and heath. The findings will help them in their independent evaluation and making important decisions of offering certainty and stable housing for the victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.

The mutual support from the wider community has helped the foundation be a success. With the support of the wider community, the victims feel comfortable having access to the support needed for their recovery. The practitioners in the Haven Counselling Program benefits from the findings of the research as they can serve individuals of all ages who have experienced sexual assault and domestic violence. The councilors need the information to address the safety concerns and needs of sexual assault and domestic violence survivors. The research will make it easier for the counseling clients to be identified and assisted referral for health and financial assistance, personal protection orders, and housing resources.

Victims of domestic violence often make several attempts to leave an abusive partner and are forced to return for economic reasons (Shackelford, 2020). Economic self-sufficiency is frequently the difference between violence and safety for many victims. Domestic violence advocates must be prepared to address many of the economic issues that victims face and facilitate opportunities for victims to learn how they can improve their economic situation. Issues such as budgeting, identity theft, banking, predatory lending, violence in the workplace, housing, and credit, all play a role in ending domestic violence (Financial Education, 2021).

The people who benefit most from these implications are the individuals from the community of interest who have been enrolled in the program. The practitioners are considered the employees of the Haven, caseworkers, social workers, intake coordinators, and others. The victims and their families will benefit because they will be able to manage their fiancés. Financial literacy gives the ability to be able to effectively cater for their expenses in addition to being able to afford to house. The wider community would be the landlords and the other people in the community who help with the housing needs. When financial literacy is best understood by the victims and their families, they would be on the right path to financial freedom addition, Haven has also a residential program that is exclusively for sexual assault and domestic violence victims and their children. (Shackelford, 2020). 

Recognizing that a lack of financial stability is one of the biggest deterrents for women who are considering leaving an abusive relationship, the Kentucky Domestic Violence Association (KDVA) formed its Economic Justice Project in the early 2000s. The program has domestic violence shelters. It is committed to providing community domestic violence services. Their purpose is to offer mutual support to the victims of domestic violence that would collectively advocate for the victims and their children. Through a network of member organizations, the Economic Justice Project offers Individual Development Accounts, free tax preparation, financial education, and other asset-building services to survivors of domestic violence (Economic Justice Project, 2021) The survivors of domestic violence are taught how to effectively manage their finances. Haven continues to connect with the community through engagement, advocacy, and education to ensure that the survivors are in a better position to support themselves.

References:

Shackelford, T. K. (2020). The SAGE handbook of domestic violence. SAGE.

Economic Justice Project. (2021, August 25). Retrieved from KDVA: http://www.kdva.org/projects/economicjusticeproject.html
Financial Education. (2021, Aug 25). Retrieved from NCADV: https://ncadv.org/financial-education

Section 3. Research Theory

3.1 Purpose of the Study

State the purpose of the study. The purpose of the study is to answer the research question or provide practical answers to a problem or weaknesses of the current practice, service, or process, policy.

This section should include:

· A summary of the intended outcomes of the study.

· An identification of who can benefit from this research and how they might benefit.

· A statement of the purpose of the study and the need that it addresses.

· A statement about the outcomes or findings of the Capstone Project and how they will be sustained.

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

The purpose of the training program is to create awareness. People that can benefit from this training program are the victims and survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence. The emphasis is on empowerment from survivors and the staff. (Finley, 2016). The program saves lives and continues to provide support and help them to move forward and have better lives without fear. The purpose is to make as many people as possible know and benefit from the program. The training program also helps the victims to have financial literacy that would make them be able t manage their finance and manage their expenses. (McOrmond-Plummer, Levy-Peck, & Easteal, 2016). The training program offers critical support and services to all that are in need. They stand in solidarity to eradicate sexual assault and domestic violence. (Ngo, & Puente Moncayo, 2021). The people who benefit most from these implications are the individuals from the community of interest who have been enrolled in the program. The practitioners are considered the employees of the Haven, caseworkers, social workers, intake coordinators, and others. (Sanders, 2013). The victims and their families will benefit because they will be able to manage their finances. Financial literacy gives the ability to be able to effectively cater for their expenses in addition to being able to afford to house. ( Fan, 2019).

References

Fan, M. D. (2019). Preventing ordinary and extraordinary violence. The Politicization of Safety, 272-300. https://doi.org/10.18574/nyu/9781479805648.003.0012

Finley, L. L. (2016). Domestic abuse and sexual assault in popular culture. ABC-CLIO.

McOrmond-Plummer, L., Levy-Peck, J. Y., & Easteal, P. (2016). Perpetrators of intimate partner sexual violence: A multidisciplinary approach to prevention, recognition, and intervention. Taylor & Francis.

Ngo, P. T., & Puente Moncayo, D. (2021). Can financial literacy reduce domestic violence? SSRN Electronic Journal. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3809469

Sanders, C. K. (2013). Financial capability among survivors of domestic violence. Financial Capability and Asset Development, 84-107. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199755950.003.0024

3.2 Research Question(s)

List the primary research question and any sub-questions that the proposed study will address. The research question(s) should be correctly formed.

This section should include a research question(s) or sub-questions that:

· Align with the research problem, the research topic, and the Capstone title.

· Identify the intended analysis.

· Is phrased in a way that will be answered by the intended methodology and analyses.

· Identify the specific variables to be explored, use language consistent with the research design or approach, and identify the population being studied.

Qualitative Example: How can DHS caseworkers help the homeless population become self-sufficient?

Quantitative Example: How does employee morale in millennial research analysts affect creativity?

Use current (within 5-7 years), scholarly, PRIMARY resources to support statements. Textbooks are not primary resources. Theses and dissertations are not considered peer-reviewed published articles. Use APA style in citing all resources.

What parts of financial literacy do domestic violence victims need help within a training protocol?

What are the best means of providing that financial literacy training to domestic violence victims?

3.3 Capstone Project Title

The Capstone Project Title should be correctly formed:

· The title should be aligned with the Research Problem (1.2) and Research Question (2.2), (use the same terminology for all).

· The title should reflect the key variables or constructs to be studied.

· The title should reflect the method to be employed in the research.

· The title should be concise (12 words or less).

Financial Literacy: Rebuilding Financially After Domestic Violence

Section 4. Research Methodology

4.1 Summary of methodology

Briefly describe the Capstone Project research design.

This section should include:

· A description of the methodology (qualitative or quantitative).

· A description of the design (case study, generic qualitative, correlation, etc.).

· A description of the type of action research (participatory action, critical action research, action science research, or appreciative inquiry).

· A description of what data will be collected (validated instruments, interviews, archival data, organization policies, and procedures, etc.).

· A description of data analysis that will be used (thematic analysis, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics).

No data will be collected. This is a service project providing a training material. For this research, the information will be collected from The Haven staff and the literature. For this research there will not be any empirical study, there will be no qualitative or quantitative methodology. All information received will come staffing, personnel, the mission statement, the trainer, and trainees after the training has been provided. All information will be kept confidential.

.

References

4.2a Quantitative Measures and Instruments

List and describe each variable and the data collection instrument or measurement tool you will use to collect these data. These should include standardized questionnaires, demographic data, and surveys, etc. See Appendix A for an example of a completed chart. Only standardized instruments can be used in quantitative studies.


Attach a copy of each instrument you plan to use as an appendix to the Capstone research form.

Variable Type

Variable Name

Survey/Questions/ Calculations

Variable Level of Measurement

Instrument Name

Reliability Estimates

*Insert more rows as needed

There are not quantitative instruments for this service project, as this is not a study.

4.2b Qualitative Constructs and Interview Guide

List and describe each qualitative construct and the data collection method you will use to collect these data. Include the alignment of the data collection source with the concept. See Appendix B for an example of a completed chart.


Attach a copy of the interview guide you plan to use


as an appendix to the Research Plan.

Data Source


Specific Data Source

Constructs of Interest

Specific Interview Question

Interview

Interviews with Staff Members

Financial Literacy

Domestic Violence

*Insert more rows as needed

NO qualitative interview questions. There are constructs involved in the development of this service project, but are not attached to any interview questions.

N/A

*4.3 Field Tests


Only complete if the research study is greater than minimal risk.

Field tests must be completed for qualitative interview questions if the study is greater than minimal risk.

According to 45 CFR 46.102(i), minimal risk means, “The probability and magnitude of harm or discomfort anticipated in the research are not greater in and of themselves than those ordinarily encountered in daily life or during the performance of routine physical or psychological examinations or tests.”

If you are unclear about the nature of the study, please consult with the Research Chair or Capella’s IRB. IRB approval is not required before a field test is conducted. The results of the field test should be submitted as part of the IRB application once the DPP is approved. Field test experts should be practitioners in the field that are knowledgeable about the topic. You may use a Capella faculty who has a relevant background.

This section should include:

· A list of the original interview questions (before the field test).

· A rationale for each original interview question that explains how the question will provide answers to the specific research question.

· The identification of field test experts (name and credentials).

· A description of the suggestions, comments, or recommendations from the field test experts.

· A list of the final, updated interview questions.

N/A; There is no field test, because there is no study or interview questions. Therefore no participants will be at risk.

4.4 Data Analysis

Detail the actual data analyses to be conducted to address each research question.

For each research question and sub-question provide the following:

· A description of the data source.

· A description of how raw data will be analyzed (transcription, calculation of scaled variables, etc.).

· A description of how data will be managed, processed, and prepared.

· The method of qualitative analysis or statistical analysis.

· A description of how data will be stored and protected.

Where are you finding the articles? Comment by Amy Lyndon: Take a stab at answering these questions.
Looking in ProQuest, PsycINFO, etc. also looking at national, state, and local governmental agencies like XYZ, also at nonprofits, etc. For professional and scholarly and governmental information.
Here’s a list of questions I will ask as sI read each source:
Did they identify any best practices?
What were their training recommendations? What did they base these recs on? Did they test any training materials?
How well did each source look at subgroups of gender, race, sexuality, etc?
Keep track of information by using a synthesis matrix to review content across multiple sources to identify commanlities and differences between source information.

How would you read them in a way that you can find the best answers.

How will you keep track of the information?

A synthesis matrix to find commonalities in literature.

4.5 Sample Size

For each data source, describe the sample size, and provide references to support sample size decisions.

How many articles? N/A Comment by Amy Lyndon: Instead of putting a number, explain which search terms you would search for a comprehensive list? “domestic violence” and “battering” and “psychological abuse” and “financial abuse”
For financial literacy, which terms will you search for?

4.6 Assumptions

Identify the key (A) theoretical, (B) topical, and (C) methodological assumptions of the Capstone Project.

This section should include:

A. A description of the theoretical assumptions will include the fundamental constructs of the theoretical foundation that you selected in Section 2.3.

B. A description of the topical assumptions will include the assumptions revealed from previous research, the literature on the topic, and assumptions made by researchers in the field.

C. A description of the methodological assumptions will include an explanation of the epistemological, ontological, and axiological philosophical assumptions that support the research methodology.

A.Theoretical: Theory

The theoretical assumption of economic empowerment theory is that women are the most affected. The assumptions of empowerment theory aim at empowering all people in society. The theory aims to reduce the powerlessness that has been created for the oppressed and the vulnerable. The other assumptions that are controversial are that economic empowerment promotes individualism and that it is a source of unmitigated competition which may bring conflicts among those that have been empowered.

B.Topical:topic

The assumption is that women have less financial literacy than men. Most of the victims of sexual assault and domestic violence are women. The other assumption is that the Haven staff interviewed will give all the needed information for the research. The staff interviewed will be assumed to represent the whole organization. It is assumed that all the victims will be helped, and they will have financial literacy that enables them to budget and manage their finances to cater to their expenses and housing

C. Methodological Assumptions

Epistemological assumptions are that during the interviews with the Haven staff, the research will get as close as possible to get information on the participants being investigated. The subjective evidence from the research is based on the individual views of the staff being interviewed. The assumption is that the social reality exists independently of human interpretation and understanding. There is an external reality that is independent of what one may understand or think. The Haven staff may understand and things differently from external reality. The other assumption is that reality can only be understood through the human mind. Ontology deals with existing things while epistemology deals with what can be known and how it can be known. Comment by Amy Lyndon: This would need to be altered, as you have no data collection method. I will look into this

4.7 Limitations

Evaluate the weaknesses of the Capstone Project at this time.

This section should include:

· The areas that need to be improved before starting the Capstone Project.

· The areas that cannot be improved.

· The reasons for not redesigning to address any of the limitations identified.

File drawer effect: The lit may have more articles that find significant differences or effects because those are more likely to be published than research that finds no significant differences or effects. Only research that finds significan differences or significant results tend to be published (the rest languish in finling cabinets). So research on best practices may show a bias. One way you can address this is to keep a log of how often a result is found

.

Some sources may be behind a paywall. Solution: interlibrary loan. If the source is from a for profit business, you may email and ask to get access to it.

Section 5 Sample and Design (Approach)

5.1 Sampling and Recruitment

For each data source, describe the sampling plan. Describe how you plan to select the sample. Include the steps you will take to recruit participants.

This section should include:

· A brief description of the data source, the sampling plan, and inclusion and exclusion criteria.

· The recruitment strategies (where applicable).

The data sources are articles not participants. Inclusion: The sources are peer reviewed journal articles, government sources, non profit organizations,

Exclusions: Dissertations because they are not peer reviewed.

5.2 Expected Site

Describe the organization or site(s) from which you expect to draw the sample.

This section should include:

· The name of the agency.

· The type of agency (profit, non-profit)government).

· (The population served.)The agency’s mission and/or human services they provide.

The Haven’s mission is to empower the survivors of domestic violence and help the individuals heal by addressing sexual assault and domestic violence by intimate partners heal by addressing and preventing sexual assaults and domestic violence. As a non-profit organization, I have a comprehensive program that caters to DV and sexual assault victims. All people in society have rights regardless of their traditions, and they are out to be protected from abusive perpetrators. The organization and the program are survivor-centered and help the victims live safely without fear.

Non-profit organization

The Haven is a temporary shelter that assistance to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.

Mission Statement: It is our goal at The Haven to provide victims with the necessary information, resources, protected head start, and supportive follow-up to transition out of a violent lifestyle and into successful independent living. The Haven aims to provide for the immediate primary needs of family violence and sexual assault clients, including food, clothing, legal advocacy, mental health assistance, and referral for medical care. The Haven interfaces with local, state, and national resources, provides transitional assistance along with the re-education of the victim and family to promote a non-violent lifestyle and educates all aspects of the local community regarding family violence and sexual assault (The Haven, 2021). Comment by Cook, Ashley – ADCT: Block Format

References

The Haven. (2021, August 25). Retrieved from Valdosta Haven: https://www.valdostahaven.org/new-page

5.3 Site Permission Comment by Amy Lyndon: Don’t you have a site permission letter from the org? That should’ve been required in a previous course.

This section should include:

· The name of the authorized individual allowing the use of the organization or site.

· A statement of whether the site has an IRB.

· The process to obtain permission to access the stakeholders, population, or data source.

Lola Rivera

Volunteer Coordinator

Tiffanie Thomas

Case Manager

5.4 Participant Contact

How will potential participants first be contacted? How will participants be contacted following the study?

N/A, there are no participants.

5.5 Action Plan and Time Frame

Describe the steps and time it will take to complete the Capstone Project. Provide a quarter-by-quarter listing of activities from start to finish. Describe the exact procedures that will be needed to carry out this study. This should read like a recipe for conducting the study. Be sure to include all the necessary details so that someone else would be able to follow this to replicate the study. (See Appendix C for an example of a completed chart.)

This section should include:

· A step-by-step description of exactly how the research will be conducted.

Quarter

Activity

Estimated time frame

Q4 Fall 2021

Complete MS 2

Week 10

Q1 Winter 2022

Ethics paper

Week 2

Q1 Winter 2022

IRB review

Week 4

Q1 Winter 2022

Mid-point “data” review of training notes

Weeks 5-10

Q2 Spring 2022

Draft of the capstone report

Week 1

Q2 Spring 2022

Draft of training materials

Weeks 2-5

Final “data” check (pivot to training materials instead of taking notes on it)

Week 6

Q1 2022

Second draft of capstone report

Weeks 7-9

Q1 2022

Mid-point capstone review and alignment check

Week 10

Q2 Summer 2022

Second draft of training materials

Week 1

Q2 Summer 2022

Final draft of training materials

Week 4

Q2 Summer 2022

Final draft of capstone report

Week 5

Q2 Summer 2022

Committee review and school review

Week 7

Q2 Summer 2022

Publications review

Week 8

Q2 Summer 2022

Dean review

Week 9-10

*Insert more rows as needed

5.6 Action Research Feedback Loop and Dissemination Plan

Describe the plan for providing feedback to stakeholders and the dissemination of the Capstone Project findings.

This section should include: Comment by Amy Lyndon: Who gets this information and how do they do so?

· The specific type of meeting (focus group, board meeting, community meeting, presentation meeting, etc.).

· The specific audience (executive administrators, directors, board members, stakeholders, etc.).

· The type of information that will be disseminated (written executive summary, verbal presentation of results, etc.).

· The key messages are based on stakeholder feedback.

· The timeline for the feedback.

How are you going to present this to the Haven? Comment by Amy Lyndon: Who do you give the training protocol to? In what form will you give it to them? Would you or they want to provide any feedback prior to a “final” version (maybe NOT the best choice) Present to the board members – eversion or pamphlet. The end goal is to make their mission better. Would bring the training program to the board members who would disseminate it to the trainers.

5.7 Action That Will Result from This Project

Describe the action sought by the project and how the action plan will be implemented.

For example, the development of a task force that will be implemented by the organization with community members.

How are you going to Comment by Amy Lyndon: The board members will send the information to the case workers, who would be the trainers. Case workers are currently responsible for the connecting the victims to the finances and ensuring all conditions are met for release of the money and housing information.

Section 6. Ethics

6.1 Ethical Considerations

Describe any ethical considerations given the sample and/or topic.

This section should include:

· An explanation of how you plan to protect participants during recruitment, data collection, and data analysis.

· A description of any ethical concerns related to researcher positionality and how the concerns will be addressed.

· A description of any possible coercion and how it will be avoided.

There are no participants because this is a service project and not an empirical study. Comment by Amy Lyndon: Communications will be between the researcher/learner and the volunteer coordinator and the case worker employed by The Haven. Since there’s no data and you will not be communicating with victims. No interactions with their clients, etc. No one in a vulnerable position will be contacted, let alone at risk.

6.2 Risk Assessment

Describe any risk to the participants and/or the organization. Reference the CITIT course for more information about minimal risk studies.

This section should include:

· A statement of whether the study is more than minimal risk.

· A statement of whether the study collects data from a vulnerable population.

· A description of any special steps will be taken to protect participants.

Not in contact with any victims who are clients of the Haven. All conversations will be held with employees of the Haven, and community partners. All conversations with personnel will be respectful of their time and efforts.

Other steps taken to protect participants will be to make sure there are no identifiers left on any documents. All participants will remain confidential. Trainers will be trained on how to effectively provide the training while still remaining ethical.

Section 7. References

List all references used in proper APA Style. You should include a minimum of 30 for the research plan but will need at least 50 for the Final Capstone Project.

References

Hejase, H. (2018). Review of “Economic empowerment of women in Lebanon”. 
https://doi.org/10.14322/publons.r2552376

Hoge, G. L., Stylianou, A. M., Postmus, J. L., & Johnson, L. (2019). Domestic violence/intimate partner violence and issues of financial abuse and control: What does financial empowerment look like? The Routledge Handbook on Financial Social Work, 15-25. 
https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351165686-3

Huston, S., & Baines, R. (2019). Sustainable management of affordable housing. Greening Affordable Housing, 18-31. 
https://doi.org/10.1201/b22317-2

Huyugüzel Kişla, G. (2019). Women empowerment in the time of crisis. Women’s Economic Empowerment in Turkey, 28-42. 
https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429053153-3

Islahi, A. A. (2020). Economic empowerment of women in Islam. Economic Empowerment of Women in the Islamic World, 21-38. 
https://doi.org/10.1142/9789811212154_0002

Karaa, İ. E. (2019). Does family democratization explain the financial literacy of women? Women’s Economic Empowerment in Turkey, 91-112. 
https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429053153-8

Lee, R. A. (2017). The affordable option: Charlotte Street manufactured housing. The Unsheltered Woman, 277-282. 
https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351302203-22

Lu, S. (2021). Financial literacy education program post-financial housing crisis. Research Anthology on Personal Finance and Improving Financial Literacy, 504-517. 
https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-7998-8049-3.ch027

Sanders, C. K. (2013). Financial capability among survivors of domestic violence. Financial Capability and Asset Development, 84-107. 
https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199755950.003.0024

Willison, C. E. (2021). America’s homelessness crisis. Ungoverned and Out of Sight, 1-15. 
https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780197548325.003.0001

Yamawaki, N., Riley, C., & Gardner, N. (2018). The effects of gender-role traditionality and gender of abuser on attitudes toward intimate partner violence and perceived body size of the victim and abuser. Partner Abuse9(3), 230-248. 
https://doi.org/10.1891/1946-6560.9.3.230

Birkenmaier, J., & Sherraden, M. (2013). Financial education and capability: Research, education, policy, and practice. Oxford University Press.

Finley, S. Y. (2021). Financial literacy, financial liberation. Financialization, Financial Literacy, and Social Education, 113-127. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003020264-7

Hoge, G. L., Stylianou, A. M., Postmus, J. L., & Johnson, L. (2019). Domestic violence/Intimate partner violence and issues of financial abuse and control: What does financial empowerment look like? The Routledge Handbook on Financial Social Work, 15-25. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351165686-3

Jarecke, J., Taylor, E. W., & Hira, T. K. (2014). Financial literacy education for women. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 2014(141), 37-46. https://doi.org/10.1002/ace.20083

Katula, S. L. (2012). Creating a haven for employees who are victims of domestic violence. Nursing Forum, 47(4), 217-225. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-6198.2012.00278.x

Khan, R., & Brewer, G. (2021). Financial abuse and control of siblings. The SAGE Handbook of Domestic Violence, 794-808. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781529742343.n48

Ngo, P. T., & Puente Moncayo, D. (2021). Can financial literacy reduce domestic violence? SSRN Electronic Journal. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3809469

Poby, K. E. (2009). Women’s financial future: A financial literacy program for incarcerated women.

Sanders, C. K. (2013). Financial capability among survivors of domestic violence. Financial Capability and Asset Development, 84-107. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199755950.003.0024

Voices from the group: Domestic violence offenders’ experience of the intervention. (2013). Intimate

Violence, 329-342. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203049594-15

Bramley, G., & Fitzpatrick, S. (2018). Homelessness in the UK: who is most at risk?. Housing Studies33(1), 96-116.

Benerjee, D., & Bhattacharya, P. (2020). The hidden vulnerability of homelessness in the Covid-19 pandemic: Perspectives from India. International Journal Of Social Psychiatry.

https://doi.org/10.1177%2f0020764020922890

Bullock, H., Reppond, H., Truong, S., Singh, M. (2020). An intersectional analysis of the feminization of homelessness and mothers’ housing precarity. Journal of Social Issues, 76(4), 835-858.
https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12406

Fowler, P., Hovmand, P., Marcal, K., & Das, S. (2019). Solving homelessness from a complex systems perspective: Insights for prevention responses. Annual Review of Public Health, 40, 465-486.
https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-publhealth-040617-013553

Fonseca, R., Mullen, K. J., Zamarro, G., and Zissimopoulos, J. (2012). What explains the gender gap in financial literacy? the role of household decision-making. Journal of Consumer Affairs, 46(1), 90–106.

Gan, X., Zuo, J., Wu, P., Wang, J., Chang, R., & Wen, T. (2017). How affordable housing becomes more sustainable? A stakeholder study. Journal of Cleaner Production162, 427-437.

Kottke, T., Abariotes, A., & Spoonheim, J. B. (2018). Access to affordable housing promotes health and well-being and reduces hospital visits. The Permanente Journal22. retrieved from:
Access to Affordable Housing Promotes Health and Well-Being and Reduces Hospital Visits (nih.gov)

Lima, N., Souza, R., Feitos, P., Moreira, J., Silva, C., & Neto, M. (2020). People experiencing homelessness: Their potential exposure to Covid-19. Psychiatry Research, 288.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112945

Mackenzie, O., Trimbur, C., & Vanjani, R. (2020). An isolation hotel for people experiencing homelessness. The New England Journal of Medicine, 383(41). DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc2022860

Dunn, M., Rawson, M., & Rogers, A. (2021). Rural housing: Competition and choice (3rd ed.). Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003132950

Gan, X., Zuo, J., Wu, P., Wang, J., Chang, R., & Wen, T. (2017). How affordable housing becomes more sustainable? A stakeholder study. Journal of Cleaner Production162, 427-437.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.06.048

Juing, H., Jaime, J., & Lee, S. (2021). Mental health in subsidized housing: Readiness to assist residents with mental health issues In Subsidized Housing From The Perspectives Of Housing Employees. Qualitative Social Work. https://doi.org/10.1177%2f14733250211027630

Kottke, T., Abariotes, A., & Spoonheim, J. B. (2018). Access to affordable housing promotes health and well-being and reduces hospital visits. The Permanente Journal22.

Muir, K., Moran, M., Michaux, F., Findlay, S., Meltzer, A., Mason, C., & Heaney, R. A. (2017). The opportunities, risks, and possibilities of social impact investment for housing and homelessness. Ng, K., & Neo, Y. (2019). Housing Problems and Social Work Advocacy in a Home-Owning Society. Journal of Social service Research, 46(5), 671-684.

Ortiz-Ospina, E., & Roser, M. (2017). Homelessness. Our World in Data.
Homelessness – Our World in Data

Polvere, L., Barness, C., & Lee, E. (2018). Housing needs of grandparent caregivers: grandparent, youth, and professional perspectives. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 61(5).
https://doi.org/10.1080/01634372.2018.1454566

Jennifer, Patrick. (2011). The Role of Financial Education in Improved Housing. https://www.findevgateway.org/sites/default/files/publications/files/mfg-en-paper-the-role-of-financial-education-in-improved-housing-jun-2011.pdf.

Gan, X., Zuo, J., Wu, P., Wang, J., Chang, R., & Wen, T. (2017). How affordable housing becomes more sustainable? A stakeholder study. Journal of Cleaner Production162, 427-437. retrieved from:
How affordable housing becomes more sustainable? A stakeholder study – ScienceDirect

Kottke, T., Abariotes, A., & Spoonheim, J. B. (2018). Access to affordable housing promotes health and well-being and reduces hospital visits. The Permanente Journal22. retrieved from:
Access to Affordable Housing Promotes Health and Well-Being and Reduces Hospital Visits (nih.gov)

Lima, N., Souza, R., Feitos, P., Moreira, J., Silva, C., & Neto, M. (2020). People Experiencing Homelessness: Their Potential Exposure To Covid-19. Psychiatry Research, 288.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2020.112945

Mackenzie, O., Trimbur, C., & Vanjani, R. (2020). An Isolation Hotel For People Experiencing Homelessness. The New England Journal Of Medicine, 383(41). DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc2022860

Morton, M., Dworsky, A., Matjasko, J., & Curry, S. (2018). Prevalence And Correlates Of Youth Homelessness In The United States. Journal Of Adolescent Health, 62(1)

Muir, K., Moran, M., Michaux, F., Findlay, S., Meltzer, A., Mason, C., … & Heaney, R. A. (2017). The opportunities, risks, and possibilities of social impact investment for housing and homelessness.
The Opportunities, Risks, and Possibilities of Social Impact Investment for Housing and Homelessness by Kristy Muir, Michael Moran, Fabienne Michaux, Suzanne Findlay, Ariella Meltzer, Chris Mason, Ioana Ramia, Richard A. Heaney:: SSRN

Ortiz-Ospina, E., & Roser, M. (2017). Homelessness. Our World in Data. retrieved from:
Homelessness – Our World in Data

Polvere, L., Barness, C., & Lee, E. (2018). Housing needs of grandparent caregivers: grandparent, youth, and professional perspectives. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 61(5).
https://doi.org/10.1080/01634372.2018.1454566

Sikorska, A. (2021). Housing Law in Poland-From the Cooperative Model to Flat Ownership. Sustainable Housing. DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.986444

Shinn, M., & Khadduri, J. (2020). Amid Plenty: Homelessness and What to do About it. Wiley

Shackelford, T. K. (2020). The SAGE handbook of domestic violence. SAGE.

Economic Justice Project. (2021, August 25). Retrieved from KDVA: http://www.kdva.org/projects/economicjusticeproject.html
Financial Education. (2021, Aug 25). Retrieved from NCADV: https://ncadv.org/financial-education

First DPP Review

|_| Approved

|_| Deferred

|_| Not Ready For Review

Reviewer Name:

Reviewer signature:

Date:

Second DPP Review

|_| Approved

|_| Deferred

|_| Not Ready For Review

Reviewer Name:

Reviewer signature:

Date:

Third DPP Review

|_| Approved

|_| Deferred

Reviewer Name:

Reviewer signature:

Date:

APPENDIX A

SAMPLE QUANTITATIVE MEASURES CHART

Variable Type

Variable Name

Survey/Questions/

Calculations

(see attached survey)

Variable Level of Measure-ment

Instrument Name

Reliability Estimates

Demo-

graphics

Gender

Q#1

Nominal

N/A

Age

Q#2

Interval

N/A

Ethnicity

Q#3

Nominal

N/A

Type of neighborhood

Q#4

Nominal

N/A

Independent Variables

Cultural competence

Q# 5 through Q# 19

All items on the scale will be summed together

1= Totally unprepared

2= Somewhat unprepared

3= Prepared but need practice

4= Ready to practice

5= Competent

*The total number of questions in the cultural competency scale is 14. The range for the scale equals 14 to 70.

The higher the number, the higher the level of cultural competency.

Ordinal

Attitude, Skills, Knowledge (ASK)

Cronbach’s alpha in other studies ranged between .91-.95 for social work practitioners


APPENDIX B

SAMPLE QUALITATIVE DATA CHART

Data Source

Specific Data Source

Constructs of Interest

Specific Interview Question

Archival Documents

Agency Background Information

Service statistics including numbers served, types of services provided, client demographics; diagnostic profiles (frequency and distribution); agency budgets, funding sources, the board of directors composition; staff data including licenses represented, years of service, length of employment, attrition rates, gender, racial and ethnic composition.

Attitude toward gay men and women and gay affirmative practice.

N/A

Researcher Observation

For this case study, research observation will include participant as an observer (researcher spends an extended amount of time in the setting but does not play an actual role) and observer as a participant (researcher interacts, interviews, and questions people within the setting) as the observational approaches. Field notes will document the content of these observations and experiences within the setting and will provide a primary source of reflective data for the case study. Field notes must be detailed and descriptive, containing both the observed data and the researcher’s responses, feelings, and impressions of the setting (Patton, 2002).

Attitude toward gay men and women and gay affirmative practice.

N/A

Individual Interviews

Agency personnel

Attitude toward gay men and women and gay affirmative practice.

Can you describe the overall attitude of the agency toward discussing gay and lesbian issues? (see attached interview)

Program Statements/Website Review/Media Review

Agency mission statements, agency values/vision statements, diversity statements, client handbooks, brochures, web sites, Facebook, and other social media sites, newspaper clippings, video representations, electronic communications.

Attitude toward gay men and women and gay affirmative practice.

APPENDIX C

SAMPLE TIMELINE CHART

Quarter

Activity

Estimated time frame

Q1 2017

Recruit agency supervisors

Weeks 1-4

Q1 2017

Conduct face to face interviews with agency supervisors

Weeks 1-10

34

Version 6.0 effective April 2020

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